Irony In Flannery O Connor's The Displace Person

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In the story the story the Displaced person, by Flannery O’Connor the author takes the reader in a journey that urge the reader to takes a position on different conflicts. Flannery O ‘Connor lived from 1925-1964. She grew up in the south as an only child. She considered her self very religious person, her daily life consisted of raising peacocks and writing. Additionally, Flannery O’Connor suffered of lupus erythematous therefor she was on crutches during her last years of life ( Baker). Flannery O ‘Connor uses many literacy devices on her many stories. In the story “The Displace Person,” the author uses symbolism, point of view and irony to give her story a sense of mystery just as Jesus work in the believer in mysterious ways.
O’Conor’s Christian
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The point of view of the characters is displaced throughout the story. First the author opens the stage for the audience to make his own understanding and conclusions of what is happening in the story. The author achieves her purpose using characters that are not as the norm. Exaggeration for the character’s behaviors has strong characteristics, which are many time seem as not real people. The way that the story is written created a dramatic tone since the audience knows what is happening before the characters do which also add irony to the story because it allows the reader to make assumptions and comments about the follow events. The reader attitude toward Mrs. Shortley is negative “Mrs. Shortly image she has was, three bears walking in single file, with wooden shoes, on like Dutchmen and sailor hats and bright coats”(O’Connor, 1954, p. 585).Mrs. Shortley acts as a stereotypical character toward the Poland family. She slowly develops a jealous attitude. “They cant talk, they know what color even is .. those pl have been through they should be grateful for what they get.” Mrs. Shortley worries abou the displaced person me her self a displaced person and her path to her death lead. The unexexpected events made the story …show more content…
Is through people, events, and sometimes nature that Jesus shows up unexpected. O’ Connor uses symbolism like the tractor, peacock, title also she uses point of view for the audience to make assumptions. Additionally, she take the reader on a journey to expects the unexped through irony. This literacy devices all join to achieve the authors purpose that is to present ways that Christianity is view through aspects of life. That when caos comes our way that he is always watching just as the peacock was always present. Also the story That when we least expect problems will come it our choice to see what we would like to learn from

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