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Thesis: People should not trust their ability to thin-slice in situations. I think that Malcolm Gladwell has proven that in experts, decisions should not be made in the blink of an eye.
Body 2: Similarly, the concept of thin-slicing has its disadvantages because it proves that people are “really vulnerable to being guided by stereotypes,”(Gladwell, 233). This holds true in cases often regarding race. For example, prior to the school integration of white and black children in the late 1950’s, the sight of a black child trying to gain an education was looked down upon in a white man’s society. It was considered “wrong” for people of the “white community” to associate with those of the “black community”. It was common for a black man to affiliated with a negative image. Taking this further, in the Brown vs. Board of Education case, Ms. Brown fought for her rights and a spot in the segregated school. The common stereotype that the role of black people was to be slaves in the 1950’s is the reason why a white man tended to sway towards segregation. However, during the court-case, the judge favored for the black girl to be allowed at the white school. The judge realized that all the white families against the case were thin-slicing, only taking into account the color of their skin. However, white men failed to notice the abilities, personalities, and drive for learning that these black children desired. The judge was able to see past all the typical stereotypes and see the truth. He announced that he would allow the black children to be at the white school, giving the children not only a chance to educate themselves, but also a chance to break the bounds imposed by segregation and create an integrated community. Based on past history, it is evident that thin-slicing is less accurate and thoughts should be filtered based on deep thought, rather than stereotypes and first judgments.

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