Into Thin Air - Human Nature Essay

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With its highest point at 29,028 feet in the troposphere, A.K.A. the tallest mountain in the world, Everest was also known for its quite lofty death rate. Especially in the summer of 1996 when three mountain climbing teams had decided to try to achieve the feat of reaching its summit. Jon Kraheur was one of the few survivors that year but to this day still holds the memories of the events that had taken place. Rob Hall, Doug Hansen, Scott Fischer, and many others had fallen victim to the mountain. What had ensued on the mountain were examples of both, good and bad, human nature which were shown through weaknesses and strengths. Courage and bravery are components needed in situations such as the ones in the book "Into Thin Air". In the disastrous events of 1996, two climbers attempted the rescue of an experienced climber named Rob Hall and an inexperienced client who was Doug Hansen. During a random storm that approached them out of nowhere Hall and Hansen had become stranded on the Hillary Step, but it was the climbers who had made the decision to save them. It takes a lot of bravery and courage for someone to risk their life for someone whom they know very little, but that is exactly what these two men did. Although it was quite obvious Hall and Hansen were going to die, the climbers still scaled the mountain during the storm who's winds howled with rage and up-turned the snow in fury. Also, the sherpas showed a courageous effort by risking their own lives as well. They were determined to at least try to rescue Hall and Hansen while pushing their fear of dying to the side. Furthermore, along with courage and bravery is usually and almost always compassion. Rob Hall showed a great example of this, when during his last moments, when he knew he was going to die, he called his wife over the radio and told her with such tenderness in his voice, not to worry about him and that everything was going to be ok. He was simply trying to reassure her for her

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