Interviewing and Interrogation

Good Essays
Joyce Simmons March 13, 2011
Week Two Journal

1.Describe the qualities that make a good interviewer. Which of these do you think is more important and why?
By having the ability to send and receive messages to the person that you are interviewing in a way that they can understand is a quality that an interviewer should possess (Gosselin, p- 13). An interviewer should not be cold and standoffish, or be on the defense or apathetic towards the person being interviewed. The person being interviewed may be going through some sort of personal conflict, be it anger or confusion. They need someone to guide them through the interview (Gosselin, p. 13). A good interviewer should not be condescending or act as if he is superior to the interviewee. A good interviewer should not be prejudiced because of someone’s appearance, past criminal history, or intellect (Gosselin, p. 14). Lastly, a good interviewer should want to know everything about the case even if the interviewee’s morals and values are different from his own (Gosselin, p-14).
Out of all these qualities, I think that it is most important to be able to talk to the interviewee in a way that he understands you and you understand him/her, while making them feel comfortable and willing to communicate with you.
2.What are some of the types of nonverbal communication that an interviewer/interrogator need to pay attention to and why? What cautions should interviewers take in regard to facial expressions during the interview?
Kinesic is defined as a “form of nonverbal communication that includes body language, facial expressions, and gestures” (Sandoval & Adams, 2001). An interviewer should mimic the sitting position, motions of hand gestures, and tone and speed in speech of the interviewee, that way the interviewee feels that the two of you have something in common and that the whole interview process is making sense (Gosselin, p 17).
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