Interpreter of Maladies

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In the book of short stories, Interpreter of Maladies, by Jhumpa Lahiri, there are many flawed couples and relationships. Some of these are flaws that are incredibly annoying such as in "This Blessed House" where Twinkle is obsessed with religious symbols and statues, or flaws that are hard to overcome such as Mrs. Das in "Interpreter of Maladies" who experiences extreme guilt that she constantly works at pushing away. With the help of Freudian theory one can analyze the flaws in these people and observe that their already strained relationships are a result their struggles to balance their three personality aspects of id, ego, and superego. The Freudian theory is based on three terms the id, superego and ego. This theory was invented by Sigmund Freud, a psychiatrist and hypnotic expert of the late 1800s and early 1900's. The id is the unconscious desires of the human personality that strive to satisfy basic sexual and aggressive desires. The superego is the more realistic view and provides standards for judgment and represents internalized ideals. The ego is largely the conscience that mediates the id and superego. The ego satisfies the id's desires in ways that will realistically bring pleasure over pain. With the support of Sigmund Feud's theory, it is inevitable that these couples and relationships are doomed to fail if the id and superego are imbalanced. In "This Blessed House" Twinkle and Sanjeev are a perfect example of the id theory. The id is the subconscience and desires of ones personality. Twinkle has an imbalance of the id. She is spoiled, demanding and usually her desires are fullfilled. When she finds each symbol her obsetion is fullfilled until she finds the next one to fullfill what her suppressed desires need. Soon this gets very annoying to Sanjeev because his desires are getting replaced by her new obsession. Sanjeev married Twinkle because he was lonely. "Sanjeev was lonely,with an excessively generous income for a single man, and had

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