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Ingredients of the Melting Pot

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Ingredients of the Melting Pot
Ingredients of the Melting Pot

When reflecting on a timeline of America, what is clear is that this nation has grown in many ways due to far-reaching ideas, movements, and historical events. Immigrants who decided to continue their lives in the United States remain as the key factor of keeping this country functioning at the prosperous rate that it is. Unfortunately, Immigration has always been a controversial matter in America. Nonetheless, the population of the United States’ composes of citizens from various backgrounds; sadly this does lead to several shortcomings. While the population fluctuates so does its economy, however, as new settlers come to America the reputation of it being a world power seems to come true once again. Since America’s population is vastly diverse the culture of the nation becomes overflowing with international influences. Simply put, America has been shaped into the nation it is today due to immigration, because without immigrants this country’s population, economy, and culture would not be what is today.
The United States’ population has always been inconsistent because of its reputation for being the land of opportunity. The Federation for American Immigration Reform has reported that since 1990, United States’ population has grown by 43 million people, an unprecedented 18 percent increase. In town after town throughout the U.S., communities are finding that population growth is overcrowding schools, clogging roads, swallowing up open space, taxing the environment, and raising the cost of living for all (Federation for American Immigration Reform). According to an analysis of the Census Bureau data by the Pew Hispanic Center, the nation’s total immigrant population reached a record 40.4 million in 2011. Consequently, there tends to be a multitude of people having no purpose in supporting the infrastructure of America. Eventually, the foreign individuals who migrate to the land of opportunity will fill any space that is



Cited: Hall, Mandi R. eHow. Web. 11 Feb. 2013. Harklute, Aurora. eHow. Web. 19 Feb. 2013. 2009. Web. 19 Feb. 2013. <http://www.cbsnews.com/2100-201_162-531433.html>. Rushdoony, Rousas J. "What is Overpopulation." FEE. 1 Feb. 1970. Web. 11 Feb. 2013. 2010. Web. 15 Mar. 2013. DVD.

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