Informative Speech

Satisfactory Essays
Speech 102
11/10/12
Informative Speech
The Symptoms of Bipolar Disorder

General Purpose: To inform
Specific Purpose: After hearing my speech, my audience will know more about the symptoms of Bipolar Disorder.
Central Idea: Bipolar Disorder is a brain disorder that causes radical shifts in moods, energy, activity levels that affects a person ability to carry out day-to-day tasks.
Introduction
I. Open with impact: Bipolar Disorder affects about 2.6% of Americans age 18 and older in a given year; The average age for onset Bipolar Disorder can occur during early 20’s and as last as your 40’s to 50’s II. Bipolar Disorder is a mood disorder caused by chemical imbalances in the brain which can result in extreme mood swings; from a person feeling very happy and “up” which is known as a manic high or feeling very sad and “down” which is known as a depressive low. III. According to Avenue.org 7 out of 10 people with Bipolar Disorder had at least one misdiagnosis IV. Connect to audience: So can you imagine yourself or love one suffering with this brain disorder which causes severe mood swings for years, before their properly diagnosis and treated because the symptoms seem like separate problems and not recognized as part of a larger problem.

(signpost: Today we will talk about its symptoms, diagnosis and treatment)

Body I. Main Point: What are the symptoms of Bipolar Disorder?

A. According to National Institute of Mental Health, for a person to be diagnosed with Bipolar Disorder, they must experience the following symptoms:

1. Mania or Manic Episodes a. A long period of feeling overly happy or friendly, mood b. Talk really fast about a lot of different things at once c. Having trouble sleeping, but does not feel tired d. Talk and think about sex more often e. Being easily distracted and behaving on impulse

2. Depression or Depressive Episodes a. A long period of feeling sad or empty b. A

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