Informal Leaders

Topics: Leadership, Statistical significance, Arithmetic mean Pages: 21 (7155 words) Published: March 5, 2013
CBA NAU


College of Business Administration
Northern Arizona University
Box 15066 Flagstaff AZ 86011

Formal vs. Informal Leading: A Comparative Analysis
Working Paper Series
00-04 — Sept 2000

C. Dean Pielstick
College of Business Administration Northern Arizona University 3714 W Church St Thatcher AZ 85552 Tel: 520-428-8344 X26 FAX: 520-428-5013 E-mail: Dean.Pielstick@nau.edu

CBA NAU


College of Business Administration
Northern Arizona University
Box 15066 Flagstaff AZ 86011

Formal vs. Informal Leading: A Comparative Analysis
C. Dean Pielstick

I. INTRODUCTION
Informal leadership has been recognized as an important factor in organizational behavior (Bass, 1990a; Doloff, 1999; Hall, 1986; Han, 1983; Robins & Zirinsky, 1996; Senge, 1996; Sink, 1998; Weiss, 1978; Wheelan, 1996; Whitaker, 1995). Nevertheless, a search of the literature reveals very little beyond a few references to informal leadership in small groups. For example, in his exhaustive review of the literature, Bass (1990a) identifies research on informal leadership only in the context of leading group discussions. Confirming this are similar findings from Bass & Steidlmeier (1999) and Wheelan (1996). Two organizational behavior textbooks (Kreitner & Kinicki, 1998; McShane & Von Glinow, 2000) include no mention of informal leadership and only brief discussion of informal groups. There is very little information available that compares these two processes of leading in leadership research. In fact, most research is done on formal leaders, those in a “position” of leadership. This complicates the analysis of the process of leading due to ways that these leaders may use the various forms of authority and power (Bass & Steidlmeier, 1999; Fairholm, 1998; French & Raven, 1959) available to persons in these positions: legitimate, coercion, and reward (specifically extrinsic reward). In other words, the formal authority of persons in positions of leadership may mask the process of leading. Informal leaders, those not in positions of leadership but recognized as leaders nevertheless, do not have such authority at their disposal. Accordingly, they must rely on “authentic leading” rather than “power-wielding” tactics available to formal leaders (Pielstick, 2000), although formal leaders may not necessarily use those tactics. Is there a significant difference between actual formal and informal leaders in the workplace regarding the use of authority? What other similarities and differences are there? As a basis of comparison, the author turned to an earlier meta-ethnographic study emphasizing transformational leadership (Pielstick, 1996, 1998) that detailed a comprehensive “leader profile.” This profile, later articulated as “authentic leading” (Pielstick, 2000), described leadership in terms of six major themes: shared vision, communication, relationships, community, guidance, and character. Shared Vision Shared vision emerged as the touchstone theme of authentic leadership. Vision is the most common distinguishing characteristic identified with leadership overall, and authentic leadership specifically. “The single defining quality of leaders is the capacity to create and realize a vision” (Bennis, 1993, p. 216). Burns (1978) stated that “such leadership occurs when one or more persons engage with others in such a way that leaders and followers raise one another to higher levels of motivation and morality” (p. 20). Such a higher purpose transcends the individual. It is elevating, enduring and transforming. Both the leader and the led elevate their sense of purpose to one that is more enduring, thus transforming each other. The leader does not impose, but may initiate, the vision. Shared vision derives from shared needs, values, beliefs and purpose(s) of the leader and the followers. “Moral leadership emerges from, and always returns to, the fundamental wants and needs, aspiration, and values of the followers” (p. 4). Vision, values, beliefs...

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