Inequlity Social Class System

Topics: Household income in the United States, Middle class, Wealth Pages: 11 (3646 words) Published: April 24, 2014
The Five classes & Statistics
The five classes are listed in order from wealth to poor. The upper class, upper-middle class, lower-middle class, working class and lower class. The upper class also known as the one percent is an exclusive group limited to the extremely wealthy. The upper-middle class are not far from the social groups and luxuries that the one percent enjoy. This class may consist of doctors, lawyers, and architects. The lower-middle class is less affluent professions such as school teachers, nurses, and a significant number of clerical workers. The working class is described as individuals whom hold regular manual or blue-collar jobs. The lower class consists individuals who cannot find regular work or make do with low paying work. This class consists primarily of single mothers with dependent children, blacks, and Hispanics. Upper Class

The upper class also known as the ‘1 percent’. This 1 percent of Americans are now taking in nearly a quarter of the nation’s income every year. In terms of wealth the top 1 percent control 40 percent of the United States wealth. These individuals are at the top of the economic ladder in that they earn more than $250,000 annually (Census Bureau). It has been reported that between 1979 and 2007 the average income of the bottom 50 percent of American households grew by 6%; the top 1percent saw their income increase by 229% (Center for American Progress). Upper-middle, Lower-middle class

The upper middle class holds about 10-15 percent of the U.S. population. Its members are very highly educated professionals with great autonomy in the work place. Graduate degrees are very common and educational attainment serves as the main distinguishing feature of this class. Household incomes vary depending on how many income earners there are within a household. One-earner upper middle class households may have incomes in the high 5-figure range while married couple household commonly have incomes of $100,000. (Gilbert, 2002; Thompson & Hickey, 2005). The lower middle class usually just called middle class consist of 30-35 percent of the population. The individuals in this class often hold college degrees, but lack the graduate degrees needed to advance to higher levels of employment. The middle class do make comfortable incomes, but have low accumulated wealth, their work is largely self-directed and does not hold a high status if any at all. Since 42% of all households had two income earners, the annual salary is roughly $32,500 to $100,000. In terms of education 27% of the people in the middle class had a bachelor's degree or higher( ). This class all share the goal of sending their children to college. Working Class

The working class population consists of about 40-45 percent of the U.S. population. The working class falls at the lowest end of the middle-class spectrum. These workers are employed in blue-collar industries or are paid by the hour. They typically have lower levels of education. Secretaries, electricians, and hair stylists are considered members of the working class. Their occupations require vocational training but generally do not require a college degree, and they likely earn an income above minimum wage but below the national average. Labor saving technologies have reduced the demand for many middle-class, blue-collar jobs. Globalization has created a worldwide marketplace, pitting expensive unskilled workers in America against cheap unskilled workers overseas. Social changes have also played a role—for instance, the decline of unions, which once represented a third of American workers and now represent about 12 percent. Of all the five classes the working class is declining at an alarming rate.

Lower Class
This class is about 20-25 percent of the U.S. population. Low education and disabilities are two of the main reasons individuals struggle to find work or fall into the lower class. The term lower class describes individuals that work...
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