Import quota analysis

Topics: International trade, Free trade, Tariff Pages: 24 (8043 words) Published: October 2, 2013
INTRODUCTION
An import quota is a limit on the quantity of a good that can be produced abroad and sold domestically. It is a type of protectionist trade restriction that sets a physical limit on the quantity of a good that can be imported into a country in a given period of time. If a quota is put on a good, less of it is imported. Quotas, like other trade restrictions, are used to benefit the producers of a good in a domestic economy at the expense of all consumers of the good in that economy. Import Quotas are a type of Non- Tariff Barrier to trade. Non-tariff barriers to trade (NTBs) are trade barriers that restrict imports but are not in the usual form of a tariff. Some common examples of NTB's are anti-dumping measures and countervailing duties, which, although called non-tariff barriers, have the effect of tariffs once they are enacted. Their use has risen sharply after the WTO rules led to a very significant reduction in tariff use. Some non-tariff trade barriers are expressly permitted in very limited circumstances, when they are deemed necessary to protect health, safety, sanitation, or depletable natural resources. In other forms, they are criticized as a means to evade free trade rules such as those of the World Trade Organization (WTO), the European Union (EU), or North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) that restrict the use of tariffs. Some of non-tariff barriers are not directly related to foreign economic regulations but nevertheless have a significant impact on foreign-economic activity and foreign trade between countries. Trade between countries is referred to trade in goods, services and factors of production. Non-tariff barriers to trade include import quotas, special licenses, unreasonable standards for the quality of goods, bureaucratic delays at customs, export restrictions, limiting the activities of state trading, export subsidies, countervailing duties, technical barriers to trade, sanitary and phyto-sanitary measures, rules of origin, etc. Sometimes in this list they include macroeconomic measures affecting trade. Definition of 'Quota'

A government-imposed trade restriction that limits the number, or in certain cases the value, of goods and services that can be imported or exported during a particular time period. Quotas are used in international trade to help regulate the volume of trade between countries. They are sometimes imposed on specific goods and services to reduce imports, thereby increasing domestic production. In theory, this helps protect domestic production by restricting foreign competition. Investopedia explains 'Quota'

Quotas are different than tariffs (or customs), which places a tax on imports or exports in and out of a country. Both quotas and tariffs are protective measures imposed by governments to try to control trade between countries. The U.S. Customs and Border Protection Agency, a federal law enforcement agency of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, is in charge of regulating international trade, collecting customs and enforcing U.S. trade regulations. Smuggling - the illegal transfer of goods into a country - is a negative side effect of quotas and tariffs. Quantity restrictions imposed by the government of one nation on imports from other nations. The primary goal of import quotas is to reduce imports and increase domestic production. Because the quantity of imports is restricted, the price of imports increases, which thus encourages domestic consumers to buy more domestic production. Import quotas are one of three common foreign trade policies designed to discourage imports and/or encourage exports. The other two are tariffs and export subsidies. NON TARIFF BARRIERS

Non-tariff barriers to trade (NTBs) are trade barriers that restrict imports but are not in the usual form of a tariff. A form of restrictive trade where barriers to trade are set up and take a form other than a tariff. Nontariff barriers include quotas, levies, embargoes, sanctions and other...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Essay about Trade Policies: Import Tariff and Quotas
  • Essay on The Protectionism Effect: Tariffs, Quotas, and Subsidies
  • import quotas and tariffs Essay
  • U.S. Import Export Analysis Essay
  • Import Substitution Essay
  • competitive analysis Essay
  • Bangladesh's Export Import Analysis Essay
  • Import Essay

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free