Imperial Presidency

Good Essays
The Imperial Presidency

The Imperial Presidency is a term that was created and made known by Arthur Schlesinger. The term is defined as a belief that the presidency is becoming too powerful. The modern president has many powers that the founding fathers did not intend for them to have. This increase in power has started ever since the formation of president Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal, and World War II. The term conveys a president that has imperial powers and is authoritarian. The president can make many decisions that the founding fathers did not intend for him to have the power to make. This includes calling a state of emergency, and declaring war without putting it through congress first. These powers are not necessarily bad but they can be taken advantage of. This violates the role the founding fathers intended congress to have. They intended congress to be the center of decision-making. The modern president also has a large Executive staff. It is the president’s staff making big decisions on his behalf that has caused the president to become more powerful. Presidents also have the right to secrecy and they can withhold any information they want from the public.

One historical example of Imperial presidency would have to be the role of Colonel Oliver North in the funding to the Contras in Nicaragua, under the presidency of Reagan. This was a huge contravention of a United States Congressional ban, and exemplifies just how much influence and power one member of a large White House staff could have. This was a huge disaster for Reagan and the Government of the United States since it had been “illegally financing a civil war of the Contra guerrillas against the Sandinista government in Nicaragua.”

According to the constitution, the president is Command and Chief of the military forces of the United States. Therefore he is able to declare war at any time, without the consent of congress. This is one of the most powerful powers that the

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Satisfactory Essays

    Imperial Presidency

    • 395 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Imperial Presidency 2 examples from 19th century - Lincoln suspended Habeas Corpus - Jefferson bought Louisiana, wasn't his Constitutional right - Jackson breaks up national bank into many "pet banks" - Jackson forced out Cherokee Indians even after Supreme Court decided on Indian side: "Supreme Court has made their decision; now let them enforce it." 4 examples from 20th century - FDR declared neutrality but sold Destroyers to Britain (Lend Lease) - Truman ceased a steel…

    • 395 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Imperial Presidency

    • 962 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Document 1: Liver and kidney pills advertisement, Sparks Company, ca. 1880s 1. What advantages would advertisers gain from using Frances Cleveland's picture? They would receive more sales because the commonwealth would trust Frances. 2. What advantages might a political candidate get from this phenomenon? It’ They will receive more attention. 3. What does advertising like this tell us about the process of political choice in the 1880s? Political choices try to get appeal towards the commonwealth…

    • 962 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Imperial Presidency: Overview In his book, The Imperial Presidency, Arthur Schlesinger recounts the rise of the presidency as it grew into the imperial, powerful position that it is today. His writing reflects a belief that the presidency is becoming too powerful and that very few people are making a real effort to stop it. He analyzes the back and forth struggle for power between Congress and the Presidency. Schlesinger breaks up the first half of the book chronologically. He begins by discussing…

    • 2175 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Restraining the Imperial Presidency The “imperial” presidency began with the presidency of Theodore Roosevelt. With his presidency, the president began to establish the legislative agenda and hold supreme authority over the creation of budgets, as opposed to Congress. Furthermore, the president was able to make agreements with foreign nations without congressional approval; the president was able to exercise executive agreements to make deals with foreign nations instead of going through the…

    • 304 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    The Evolution of the Imperial Presidency from FDR to Obama, and How it Has Changed the Fabric of American Society. When the Constitution was first written by America’s founding fathers, they intended for the executive branch to serve the nation’s citizenry by keeping their best interests at heart, but stated that in no way should this branch be more powerful than any other—it be constantly checked and balanced by the legislative and judicial branches.. In James Madison’s Federalist…

    • 2910 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Presidency

    • 563 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Failures of MANUEL ROXAS: His administration was marred by graft and corruption; moreover, the abuses of the provincial military police contributed to the rise of the left-wing (Huk) movement in the countryside. His heavy-handed attempts to crush the Huks led to widespread peasant disaffection. The good record of Roxas administration was marred by two failures: the failure to curb graft and corruption in the government, as evidenced by the Surplus War Property scandal, theChinese immigration…

    • 563 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Imperial President

    • 1203 Words
    • 5 Pages

    ‘More imperiled than imperial.’ Discuss this view of the US presidency (30 marks) Imperial presidency is a term, popularized by the book, written in 1973, by Arthur Schlesinger, a former aide to JFK, called ‘The Imperial Presidency”. It is used to refer to a presidency characterized by the misuse and abuse of the powers of the presidency.. In particular, it refers to the misuse of power and excessive secrecy in dealing with foreign policy. The founding fathers intended the president not to…

    • 1203 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Presidency

    • 705 Words
    • 3 Pages

    THBT presidents should be able to serve more than one term in office in Korea. I am the Prime Minister, here to present two arguments that this motion will realize true democracy and bring growth from long-term projects. Before we start the round, I would like to define President: President- One appointed or elected to preside over an organized body of people, such as an assembly or meeting. Criteria: If we can prove that allowing presents to serve for more than one term promotes true democracy…

    • 705 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Presidency as an institution Both the administration of Carter and Reagan were shaped by the Cold War in the aftermath of Watergate. Watergate created cynicism of the government, which in turn made governing difficult both intentionally as well as improvisational because the institution of the President was seen as acting in the best interest of itself. President Jimmy Carter and President Ronald Reagan both had their difficulties as President. Carter had terrible problems with economics as…

    • 1255 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Eisenhower Presidency

    • 1356 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Leslie Irizarry Irizarry 1 10 November 2012 The Dwight David Eisenhower Presidency Republican candidate General Dwight D. Eisenhower was inaugurated as the 34th President of the United States on January 20, 1953, becoming the first Republican in twenty years to be elected as president. President Eisenhower broke tradition by reciting his own prayer after taking the oath instead of kissing the Bible and jumping right into his inaugural speech. “When elected for a second term…

    • 1356 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays