Impact of Nazi Rule on German Youth

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How much impact did Nazi rule have on German youth in the years 1933-39? (20 marks).

To brainwash the young, Jewish and anti-Nazi teachers were sacked and subjects were given a pro-Nazi bias so children would accept Nazi ideas without questioning them. The Nazi youth organisation used physical activities to indoctrinate boys to glorify war while girls were taught to welcome their role as mothers.
Employment
The Nazis implemented a major programme of public works, such as building and repairing roads, railways and houses. This significantly helped reduce unemployment, as did large-scale military rearmament. With Germany building up its armed forces, thousands of jobs in iron, steel, aviation and shipbuilding were created. After 1935, conscription of men into the army also helped reduce the unemployment figures. This was seen as a benefit to the country and enabled many Germans to accept Nazi rule.

The life of a German child changed dramatically during the 1920’s and 30’s, especially for those who were to no longer be regarded as German. They were forcefully united under the swastika by the Nazi’s, they were brainwashed into complete loyalty to the Nazi’s through what they were taught by the schools and the Nazi’s education system. The system was extremely effective and managed to gain the complete loyalty and support of the German youth by the 1930’s as anyone who didn’t was dealt with severely. The Nazi’s created youth organizations for boys and girls and for different age groups, for boys aged 10-14 there was the Deutsches Jungvolk and the Hitler Jugend for boys aged 14-18 years old, for girls aged 10-14 there was the Jungmädel and the Bund Deutscher Mädel for girls aged 14-18 years old. These organizations and the Nazi education system brainwashed the youth to the Fuhrers command. Despite all this most of the youth enjoyed the activities they did and the pride of representing their

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