Igbo Culture

Good Essays
In Things Fall Apart, Chinua shows us what it is like in Igbo culture in Nigeria. In the culture of the Umuofia women and men each have different roles in the village such as the type of work they do ,how they are supposed to behave and what place they have in the society. It is up for the people higher on the society to decide the rules and to enforce the law, such as village elders or men with titles. In this story Chinua narrates Okonkwo a hyper-masculine man living with perpetual anger and his perspective of himself and the members of the tribe. Okonkwo is one of the only few men who have many titles and is wealthy According to the book misfortune comes after him after he kills his adopted son. He later is banned from the clan after accidently …show more content…
“ They {women} scrubbed and painted the walls under the supervision of men.” pg 89. Most of the gender roles focus on women to please the men. Sometimes the men beat their women with an exception on the Week of Peace. Okonkwo gets angry most of the time with his son and wives but always has a soft side for people that have power or are more like him. Sometimes he calls weak men “agabala” or woman when he wants to insult them. Some Igbo men mistreat their women because they are considered inferior. Sometimes women are considered more like pieces of property. The more wives you had the more powerful and rich you are. More women means and extra hand on the crops . This could mean the husband could be even more richer if he has a healthy crops. “Okeye}...was not a failure like Unoka. he had a large barn and had 3 wives . And now was going to take the Idemili title the third highest in the land.” pg 6 There are 3 things that define a man in Umuofia , how many houses , tiles and wives you have. Men do not always focus on belittling women because they do care for them and also have very important roles of their own. Women provide the extra hand in working with crops and also taking care of the …show more content…
The men in the Igbo society must work in the farms in order to support his family. Some crops are meant for different types of genders. For instance men tend to the yam crops because they are the staple food for the village.”Yam, the king of crops, was a very exacting king. For three or four moons it demanded hard work and constant attention from cock-crow …” pg 23. Yams require a good deal of attention to grow successfully. They are the staple food and is such a burden that women aren't allowed to grow them.Sometimes men who fight in wars are considered more brave and may earn more titles.Since men were subject to such potential in the tribe they have to earn the most power they can in the tribe so they could support the generation. The women are not allowed to earn titles. The Igbo revolve around a government not of the greed to obtain the most power but to earn the titles given to help the village. Okonkwo is well known warrior and very proud of the titles he earned. “His fame rested on solid personal achievements."pg 3 The value of what a man can earn in the Umuofia tribe consists of hierarchy of skill and strength not of wealth and power. Okonkwo lived his life trying to do the opposite of what his father did. Okonkwo was powerful and persistent enough to build his own house and fight for the clan in order to earn titles. Unfortunately the titles earned by the Igbo were ignored during the colonization of the Europeans.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Better Essays

    Igbo Culture

    • 1329 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Ibo Culture Imagine living a life with a completely different set of cultures and traditions; it is hard to do. Many people in the world today do not take the time to acknowledge the ways in which other societies live or how their cultures and traditions shape the way they are. The way in which a culture survives depends on the people’s capacity to understand and transfer it to succeeding generations.The Ibo culture has succeeded in maintaining its unique customs and traditions and is still successful…

    • 1329 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Igbo Culture

    • 219 Words
    • 1 Page

    The novel was taken place in the late 1800’s when the British were expanding their influence in Africa with their culture, government, and most importantly their religion. The Igbo culture highly regarded tradition, culture, and their beliefs, so when they became aware of the British and their “lunatic religion” (Achebe, 1099), they became fearful for what they did not yet know. For instance, it’s seen as a sign of masculinity if a man takes in many wives. However, the Europeans such as the British…

    • 219 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Polygamy in Igbo Culture

    • 3284 Words
    • 14 Pages

    POLYGAMY IN IGBO CULTURE In the whole world, there are five continents. Africa is the world’s second largest continent, with 80 percent of its area in the tropics. Africa is usually portrayed as a dark continent historically and physically isolated from the rest of the world but it is not. Nigeria is one of the most important country in Africa. It is located in western Africa, bordering the gulf of Guinea between Benin and…

    • 3284 Words
    • 14 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Igbo Culture Change

    • 699 Words
    • 3 Pages

    violent traditions within the Igbo culture being changed. Throughout the novel, the arrival of the white settlers and missionaries force the Igbo people to change some of their cultural traditions. The beliefs and traditions of a given culture encourage cultural violence and practice upon the members. The main character, Okonkwo, proves to be a major catalyst for change in the Igbo culture due to his unconventional beliefs. While Hoegberg argues that the violent Igbo traditions take a turn due to…

    • 699 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Igbo Culture Essay

    • 842 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Igbo Society Expectation on Men and Women Igbo culture is a culture that is hard for the men and women of the American culture to understand. It is one those cultures were people know what the culture is but they still think it is from the mid 1900’s and before. One can see the how extremely different women and men are treated. In the book Things Fall Apart by Chinua Achebe it is very clear about how men and women are treated very differently in their roles in society. This book also gives people…

    • 842 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Igbo Culture

    • 423 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Comparison of “Dulce at Decorum Est” and “The Death of a Soldier” Conflict is just as natural to man as cooperation. War has existed as long as the human race. Soldiers sacrifice many things when they go to war: family, safety, morals, the often their lives. Wilfred Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est” and Wallace Stevens's “The Death of a Soldier” both discuss war and its effect on the soldiers who fight in it, particularly the death of soldiers at battle. Both poets agree that dying a martyr at the…

    • 423 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    COLLEGE OF SOCIAL AND MANAGEMENT SCIENCES DEPARTMENT: BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION COURSE TITLE: NIGERIA PEOPLE AND CULTURE COURSE CODE: GNS 203 COURSE LECTURER: MRS MBAKA ASSIGNMENT: GATHER PICTURE BOTH FROM THE INTERNET AND REAL LIFE AND BUILD AN ALBUM ILLUSTRATING NIGERIA PEOPLE AND THEIR CULTURE NIGERIA THE PEOPLE AND THEIR CULTURE Nigerian people and culture famous for her huge population of more than 150 million and with more 370 ethnics groups, Nigeria has the highest…

    • 829 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    marriage has been passed down through the Igbo culture. As a result, the Igbo culture still thrives as a community with this tradition. Through the culture there is history for the arranged marriage tradition, there is the stability and the consequences of the marriage, and in the story “Marriage is a Private Affair” the father Okeke opposes his son’s choice to refuse the arranged marriage and stay from tradition. Arranged marriage has been a tradition in many cultures for centuries. Throughout the history…

    • 751 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Polygamy in Igbo Culture

    • 935 Words
    • 4 Pages

    marriages which involve rather irregular “girl friends” and somewhat regular “outside wives” (Karanja 1994; Mann 1994). In addition to making the control of sexually transmitted diseases difficult (Caldwell, Caldwell, and Orubuloye 1992), the culture of polygamy also helps maintain a very high fertility level. It has thus contributed to the explosive population…

    • 935 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Igbo

    • 1145 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Igbo Marriage To the Igbo people of West Africa marriage is essential in life. Among the Igbo marriage serves many different purposes other than unity between individuals and social status. Marriage plays significant roles in the Igbo status system for the individuals and their family and relatives. Similar to some traditional American marriages the Igbo marriages have many customs and face new trends that alter the norm of society. The Igbo have a marriage system that straddles the line of old…

    • 1145 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays