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If Nas Ruled The World Essay

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If Nas Ruled The World Essay
Edness1

Geremiah Edness
Instructor Duffy
English 101
November 19, 2012
One Country, Under Nas We have all fantasized about ruling the world in our free time. Whether you ruled with an iron fist or gave free ice cream to your followers, everybody has rules differently. In the song “If I Ruled The World” by Nas featuring Lauryn Hill, Nas imagines a world that can only be classified as “ghetto fabulous”. Although this song ideally disagrees with everything I believe in, I support Nas idea of unity. The world that nas speaks of is a place where you can smoke weed “in the streets without the cops harassin”, “court without trial” and people “more conscious of the way we raise our daughters”. This may sound like anarchy for the most part, but Nas speaks of a place like paradise for some. Nasir, formally known as Nas, was raised in
Queens, New York. This is shown evident from the song alone. Nas speaks of problems that you would not find many other places other than the slums of New York. In the song he speaks of “Welfare”, “weed”, cocaine, “parole”, undercover cops, and the list continues. These ideas may seem foreign, but Queens alone feels like a different world from the close by New
York City. This is why I like this song. He did not attempt to speak politics or economy values when he showed us a glimpse of his hierarchy but he spoke of a world that Queens knew nothing about. Nasir spoke of a peaceful place. This song was an effective persuasive audio essay because he clearly stated his main idea, supported it, and reached the targeted
audience.

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