Top-Rated Free Essay

Humanistic Theory and Trait Theory Comparison-Wk 2

Satisfactory Essays
Humanistic Theory and Trait Theory Comparison
PSY210
Trudy Linden-Craft
November 11, 2011
Axia College
Alicia Amborski

Humanistic Theory and Trait Theory Comparison In comparing the Humanistic and Trait Theories, a researcher will find that there are a plethora of differences between the two theories and quite a few similarities. However, the theories equally concur that a person’s personality is somewhat invented by the choices the person make. These two theories hardly come close to each other’s depiction of a person’s personality and have just about nothing in common. The Humanistic Theory is the least methodical of the other theories analyzing individuals as distinctive with each seeing the world from different point of views. Examining how external stimulation affects an individual’s behavior with a modest amount or no interest on an individual’s behavior is also a part of the Humanistic Theory. The Existentialist philosophy, in a nutshell, is explained as one’s life determined by the choices they make and not by fate is where the Humanistic Theory derives. “Humanistic theory allows that one 's personality can be manipulated by others who place conditions on one 's worth, negatively altering one 's self esteem” (Nevid & Rathus, 2005). An example of this theory would be someone believing that are a generous person but often leaves a small tip in a restaurant by justifying how bad the service was that they received. A trait is a permanent characteristic of a person’s constant interactions; or basically “what makes us who we are” (allpsych.com, 2004). The Trait Theory includes five factors that are used to examine a person’s personality in terms of Agreeableness, Openness to experience, Conscientiousness, Extroversion/introversion, and Neuroticism. The theory also examines how a person’s personality affects their choices, experiences, and the development of their skills. A person’s culture and genetics generally impacts the traits of the person oppose to their environment. Throughout a person’s life, it is their traits that are deem to remain consistent. Trait theory may be more useful in determining what career may fit an individual 's primary personality traits or attempt to predict and prevent mind disorders such as schizophrenia than modifying undesirable behavior through behavior modification therapy. (Nevid & Rathus, 2005) An example in the workplace would be a salesperson excelling in his or her career if the person is more of an extrovert. Each of these theories has their own values and abilities in examining an individual’s personality, even though both are consistently indifferent of each other. As one, the Humanistic Theory and Trait Theory do contain differences when compared to each other but they also are used to successfully view an individual’s personality.

References
Heffner, C. L. (2002). Personality Synopsis. Introduction to Trait Theory. (Ch. 7). Retrieved November 11, 2011 from, http://allpsych.com/personalitysynopsis/trait.html
Nevid, J. S., & Rathus, S. A. (2005). Psychology and the challenges of life: Adjustment in the new millennium (9th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

References: Heffner, C. L. (2002). Personality Synopsis. Introduction to Trait Theory. (Ch. 7). Retrieved November 11, 2011 from, http://allpsych.com/personalitysynopsis/trait.html Nevid, J. S., & Rathus, S. A. (2005). Psychology and the challenges of life: Adjustment in the new millennium (9th ed.). Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Humanistic Theory and Trait Theory My research was comparing the Humanistic Theory and Trait Theory. Humanistic Theory is based on the ability for individuals to be able to uniquely diverse with our own prospective on life. It evaluates how an individual’s choice can affect their decision making and how the decisions can take a positive or negative effect to the conclusion of that choice. It also focuses on how we allow others to manipulate us into believing what our self worth is, if we are capable…

    • 372 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Humanistic Theory

    • 363 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Humanistic theory Humanistic theory is believed to be a behavior based upon the idea that people has the potential to make great contributions to society. Therefore, in order to do so they should be a good and loving person. Psychologists believe that if people fulfill needs such as; physiological needs, these needs include the basic needs that are essential to survive, such as the need for food, water, sleep and air. Another need is security; security needs are important to survival but…

    • 363 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Humanistic Theories

    • 335 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Hum Humanistic and existential personality theories Sherry D Lewis Monica Young Quintina Jackson PSY/405 March 11, 2012 Dr. Amanze Ihedioha Humanistic and existential personality theories This paper is about human and existential personality theories. In this paper team C will analyze the strengths and limitations of the theories listed in explaining individual’s behavior. Through…

    • 335 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Humanistic Theory

    • 1370 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Experiential and Humanistic Theory As a person goes through life and has ups and downs, their ability to handle the stress varies from person to person. At times, a person has difficulties maintaining all the pressures of issues that sometimes feel to manifest into deep sensations of falling. Not knowing where to turn or where to go to get a clear view of what it is that may has them continuing to feel all of the world is against them. Many people rely on friends and family to get that ear…

    • 1370 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Humanistic Theory

    • 978 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Origins of client personality/personality/problems/symptoms. The humanistic theory is based off the idea that disclosure between the helper and client is important in session. Disclosure allows for a value of transparency and genuineness to be placed on the therapeutic relationship, resulting in openness of the client and helper. From the humanistic perspective, the client’s problems developed from a lack you organismic valuing process. When this happens conditions of worth become the path for how…

    • 978 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Humanistic Theory

    • 251 Words
    • 2 Pages

    Humanistic Perspective The focus of the humanistic perspective is on the self, which translates into "YOU", and "your" perception of "your" experiences. This veiw argues that you are free to choose your own behavior, rather than reacting to environmental stimuli and reinforcers. Issues dealing with self-esteem, self-fulfillment, and needs are paramount. The major focus is to facilitate personal development. Two major theorists associated with this view are Carl Rogers and Abraham Maslow.…

    • 251 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Better Essays

    Trait Theory

    • 1105 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Trait Theory Gerald Joseph Camilleri University of Chaminade Trait Theory Do you remember taking those personality quizzes where they ask you to describe your personality? What types of things did you mark? Did you mark terms such as friendly, caring, outgoing, and talkative? All these are prime examples of traits. The study of human personality has fascinated people from the dawn of time. The four major personality perspective attempts to describe patterns in personality…

    • 1105 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Comparison Paper: A Comparing Traits and Skills Theories Impact on Leadership Robert L. Reese Grand Canyon University October 1st, 2014 Introduction In this review (see table 1) two empirical articles were compared, one that reviewed Trait Theory of leadership, and the other that reviewed Skills Theory of leadership. Personality and Leadership: A Qualitative and Quantitative Review, authored by Timothy A. Judge, Joyce E. Bono, Remus Ilies, and Megan W. Gerhardt conducted…

    • 3072 Words
    • 13 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Trait Theory

    • 712 Words
    • 3 Pages

    As I began the process of preparing for this week’s assignments and I noticed that a great deal of emphasis was being put on personality trait testing, I have to say I was a little bit nervous as I have never really put much stock into those particular types of tests being very accurate. But after reading chapters 7 and 8 in our text Personality: Theory and Research, the article on Gordon Allport, and most specifically taking the self monitoring test myself and comparing the results given to…

    • 712 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    I. INTRODUCTION The emergence of humanistic learning theory can not be separated from the movement of humanistic education that focuses on affective outcomes, learning about how to learn and learning to enhance creativity and human potential. This humanistic approach emerged as a form of disapproval on two previous views, the views of psychoanalysis and behavioristik in explaining human behavior. Disagreement is based on the assumption that the views of psychoanalysis too pessimistic outlook bleak…

    • 1494 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Good Essays