Human Trafficking: Annotated Bibliography

Satisfactory Essays
Annotated Bibliography
Abas, M., Ostrovschi, N., Prince, M., Gorceag, V., Trigub, C., and Oram, S. (2013). Risk Factors for mental disorders in women survivors of human trafficking: a historical cohort study. BMC Psychiatry. Volume 13. Issue 1.
This article addresses the mental state of women who have been trafficked. It speaks of the issues they have as a result of the ordeal they have endured. Some of these mental issues consist of: depression, anxiety, and post-traumatic stress disorder.

Elliot, J. & McCartan, K. (2013). The Reality of Trafficked People’s Access to Technology. Journal of Criminal Law. Volume 77. Issue 3.
The research conducted in this article discusses how people who have/are being trafficked may have access
…show more content…
It explains how women, men, and children are trafficked and sold for use of slaves. It also explains that this is not a new occurrence, but is an issue that has not been widely addressed in the past.

Harvard Law Review. (2013). Counteracting the Bias: The Department of Labor’s Unique Opportunity to Combat Human Trafficking. Volume 126. Issue 4.
This article discusses the Trafficking Victim’s Protection Act of 2000. The act ensures that it will prosecute violators, protect victims, and prevent trafficking. It also discusses human trafficking for uses in the sex trade and for labor purposes. An analysis is conducted in the article to outline the responsibilities of the Department of Homeland Security and the Department of Justice in regards to human trafficking.

Knepper, P. (2013). History Matters: Canada’s Contribution to the first Worldwide Study of Human Trafficking. Canadian Journal of Criminology & Criminal Justice. Volume 55. Issue 1.
This article discusses the history of human trafficking. It explores the first worldwide study conducted on the topic. The study was conducted during the 1920’s by the League of Nations and included Canada as one of 28 countries to

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Human Trafficking Causes

    • 1089 Words
    • 5 Pages

    The international community has recognized the factors that feed into and facilitate human trafficking, including: (1) the increasing gaps between rich and poor both within countries and between regions, which means that many (women) have become more subject to trafficking in view of their economic circumstances and their hopes for increased income for themselves and their families ; and (2) the increasing ease of international travel and the growing phenomenon of temporary migration for work, which means that opportunities for trafficking have increased .…

    • 1089 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    Kotrla, K. (2010). Domestic minor sex trafficking in the United States. Social Work 55(2), 181 –…

    • 2619 Words
    • 75 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Better Essays

    Human trafficking is on the up rise; therefore, we have an increasing opportunity for greater interventions within our community. Traffickers target vulnerable Native women and youth who struggle with mental illness and substance abuse. These young women are easy targets because their mental illness affects their thought process of being able to recognize being exploited. Unfortunately, these young women believe these exploiters lies and deceit. They believe the pimps are their boyfriends and love them. Which in turn makes it hard to break away from their pimps even though they are getting treated so badly. (Research Roundup: Native American Women May be Vulnerable to Sex Trafficking. 2013)…

    • 1867 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Although it can occur at local levels, human trafficking has transnational implications, as recognized by the United…

    • 741 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Best Essays

    A common definition of human trafficking was codified under this law which defines human trafficking as, “the recruitment, harboring, transportation, provision, or obtaining of a person for one of three…

    • 3377 Words
    • 14 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    Human trafficking transgresses national borders and is a growing form of transnational organized crime that poses a global security threat. Human trafficking for prostitution and forced labor is one of the fastest growing areas of international criminal activity with the overwhelming majority of…

    • 594 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Cited: Bales, Kevin. “Human Trafficking: Overview.” Issues: Understanding Controversy and Society. ABC-CLIO, 2012. Web. 16 Apr. 2012.…

    • 1505 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    In her article, "Human Trafficking: An International Problem with an International Solution Requiring National Implementation", Melanie Franco analyzes the obstacles that victims of human trafficking face in being identified and properly cared for on in the United States. She provides an overview of legal issues in the enforcement of international human rights, focusing especially on the need for better training and administration in the U.S. Significant disparity exists between the fight against human trafficking in the U.S. and the U.N. Franco asserts that the discrepancies between the two hinder the anti-trafficking movement because the United States does not hold itself to the same standards as other countries. The Trafficking Victims Protection Act, the United States' official stance on human trafficking, provides a firm foundation for proper legal treatment of victims but is lacking in its method of identifying severely trafficked victims. Implementing international law on a national level, Franco insists, will greatly improve the effectiveness of anti-human trafficking efforts.…

    • 500 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Human Trafficking has a negative effect on the economy and society in both the sex industry and labor enslavement. In the involvement of the sex trafficking, Victims “suffer extreme physical and mental abuse”(p2), causing the victim to have to have some type of treatment if injuries are sustained. In some cases…

    • 809 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The effects of human trafficking (physical {sleep deprivation, poor diet, diseases} and psychological {stress, fear, depression, suicide})…

    • 1218 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Goldberg, Michelle. "The Super Bowl of Sex Trafficking." Newsweek 7 Feb. 2011: 7. Criminal Justice Collection. Web. 4 Apr. 2013.…

    • 796 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Best Essays

    Thesis Statement – Human trafficking for sexual purposes is an ever growing, global, inhumane plague, but the laws meant to abolish it really are hurting the victims more than they are helping them.…

    • 2823 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Human Trafficking In Canada

    • 2620 Words
    • 11 Pages

    As Edmund Burke, an Irish philosopher in the 1700’s once said “Slavery is a weed that grows in any soil” (Perrin, 2010); indeed slavery is a weed that has not yet been exterminated from our society. Like most weeds, it grows fast and is stubborn to stay. In the world today this unwanted slavery has manifested in the form of human trafficking. You may be surprised to learn that even today people are still being bought and sold as if objects and property. Human trafficking is a global problem that is on the rise particularly in Asia (Government of Canada, 2012). There are an estimated number of 2.44 million people trafficked and exploited around the world today (BAGLAY, 2011). Yet human trafficking is not only a global problem, but is increasingly being committed in our…

    • 2620 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    The definition of human trafficking has changed since the first reports in 1994. The U.S department of state began to collect reports on trafficking across borders as a severe violation of human rights. Its’ office to monitor and combat trafficking in persons originally focused on the sexual exploitation of women and girls smuggled by international prostitution. Over the years the definition has broadened to cover anyone recruited, transported, transferred, harbored, and compelled to work in prostitution, domestic service, agriculture, construction work or factory sweat shops, by means of coercion, force, abduction, fraud or deception. Any commercial sex act performed by a person under age 18 is considered human trafficking, regardless of whether force, fraud, or coercion is involved. (Karmen, 2012)…

    • 1383 Words
    • 40 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Siddharth, Kara. “Designing More Effective Laws Against Human Trafficking” (2009) Academic Search Premier. Web. 1 Dec. 2012…

    • 1591 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays