Hulga Hopewell's Deception

Better Essays
A Salesman’s Deception
Hulga Hopewell was a thirty-two year old woman who still lived at home with her mother, Mrs. Hopewell. She did not enjoy her mother’s company nor did she enjoy the company of the neighbor, Mrs. Freeman, or Mrs. Freeman’s two daughters, Glynese and Carramae. In her mind, Hulga referred to them frequently as Glycerin and Caramel. She did find joy in the company of a young man named Manley Pointer, though, who taught Hulga that he was not the boy he seemed to be and that she never should have trusted him.
Hulga Hopewell was a very intelligent woman who was involved in an unfortunate hunting accident at the age of ten. During this accident, her leg was shot off and she was never quite the same. She had a degree in philosophy,
…show more content…
Hopewell loved what she referred to as good country people; she thought they were the salt of the earth. That is why she allowed Mr. and Mrs. Freeman and their two daughters to live in their tenant house, even though Mrs. Freeman was a very nosey neighbor. So when a polite, young country gentleman named Manley Pointer came by one day selling bibles, she could never have known that he was in fact the scum of the earth. He took an instant interest in Hulga and quickly accepted the invite to stay for dinner. At dinner Manley did what he was expected to do, which was to talk about the lord, his church, himself, and also of a heart condition that was similar to Hulga’s. Mrs. Hopewell was touched by this young man and extended him an invitation to come back any time he wished, which he kindly accepted. As he was leaving, he stopped to talk to Hulga. Their conversation began with a lousy joke about a chicken and he asked her how old she was. Her response was a lie; she claimed she was only seventeen. He then told her that he noticed she had a wooden leg and that he found her very brave and sweet and that they were destined to meet. He also asked her to meet him on Saturday at her gate and go on a picnic with him, to which she

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Good Country People

    • 1620 Words
    • 7 Pages

    2) The relationship between Mrs. Freeman and Mrs. Hopewell is that Mrs. Freeman’s husband works for Mrs. Hopewell and they are friends and every morning they sit and gossip and eat breakfast together. Mrs. Hopewell likes to call Mrs. Freeman a “lady” and that her family is a bunch of “good country people” (185). This might just be because Mrs. Freeman agrees with every single thing Mrs. Hopewell says, and also says, “I always said so myself” (186).Their names are significant because Mrs. Hopewell likes to hope for new things in her life. “Nothing is perfect!” is one of her favorite sayings that she says constantly (185). Mrs. Hopewell doesn’t like to think that her daughter will ever grow up, she has thought this way since her daughter had a bad accident; “she thought of her still as a child because it tore her heart to think instead of the poor stout girl…

    • 1620 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Mrs. Hopkins was the wife of the governor of Hardford. She was depicted as a religiously focused young women with some unusual qualities. She had a physical, mental weakness that left her incapable of understanding or reason. However this disease had been growing for several years. To overcome or distract herself she would fully devote her time to reading and writing and even wrote many books. Mr. Hopkins was a loving man and would tend to his wife’s needs; however, he would never make his grief seen, especially in front of his wife. But because she went looking for trouble in men’s business she got hurt and for that he blames…

    • 1655 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    To begin with women in the 1930’s desired to seek a friend, one that can understand their struggles. In the novel all the male characters have no sympathy for Curley’s wife, and have misinterpret her…

    • 995 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Horrified due to her abolitionist mindset, Sarah attempts to politely decline her alleged gift, but faces chastisement from her mother. Charlotte creates leverage of Sarah’s capacity for kindness and perfidiously lures her into a burdensome obligation; to make Handful free. A thoroughly substantial relationship rather than a maid in waiting and master is developed between Handful and Sarah, “Whatever it was, I began telling Hetty confidences I’d kept only with myself” (Kidd 58). Their friendship is based off of Sarah’s willful attitude towards teaching Handful literacy skills, and rooted on Handful’s alacrity as a student. Sarah begins to teach Handful the art of reading and writing as a result of Charlotte’s obscure threat, however, a magnificent incipience of friendship is mutually created in the process, which possesses the potential to lead Handful to freedom. Based on the textual evidence, I conclude that Charlotte and Handful will secure their freedom due to Charlotte’s promise with Sarah, and Handful’s alliance with Sarah…

    • 398 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Good Country People

    • 870 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Joy has changed her name to Hulga, which is a symbol of the control she has for her own life and the ugly lack of meaning she sees in the world around her. Hulga is an atheist who refuses to allow her mother to keep a Bible in the family parlor. She has no problems with treating others poorly she claims “We are not our own light!" (184). Form this quote Hulga shows she is Nihilist therefore we know nothing and can’t know anything.…

    • 870 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Humor of Flannery Oconnor

    • 822 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The most blatant and simple type of humor is found while observing the flat characters of Mrs. Freeman and Mrs. Hopewell. These two women begin the story by participating in routine gossip with one another. Their constant bickering and desire to feel superior to the other is humorous because of how uneducated they sound. O’Connor puts them in the category of “good country people” due to the fact that they are pure, simple, and honest. This is ironic because good country people are referred and compared to as trash multiple times in the story. Another example of irony includes when Mrs. Hopewell said that the Freemans were a “godsend,” but the reason she had hired them was that there were no other applicants. Despite Mrs. Freeman being extremely nosy, Mrs. Hopewell ironically refers to her as a “lady and that she was never ashamed to take her anywhere or introduce her to anybody they might meet” (O’Connor 379). O’Connor uses these two women to lighten up the mood of the story before introducing Mrs. Hopewell’s atheist and pessimistic daughter Joy.…

    • 822 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Hulga, the daughter of Mrs. Hopewell, is everything opposite of a Southern Belle. Although her mother would love for her to be a definition of a true lady, she wants to cut anything tying her to the tyrannical clutches of her mother’s ideals of a lady. Hulga has a Ph.D. in philosophy and with her degree came her…

    • 1051 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Good Country People

    • 1434 Words
    • 6 Pages

    The narrator only compounds the laughable idea that these women are up to par with the average reader--after all, O'Connor was a well educated woman, writing for the literate--when he/she notes Mrs. Hopewell's "charitable" pride of Mrs. Freeman: Mrs. Hopewell liked to tell people that Mrs. Freeman was a lady and that she was never ashamed to take her anywhere. The reader is inclined to laugh even harder at this, a terrible irony, after having already established both ladies as simple,…

    • 1434 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    The novel opens up with a man, Lockwood, who rented a home in Thrushcross Grange in Yorkshire. He meets this housekeeper, Ellen Dean, who was very close with the Earnshaw family. Due to Lockwood’s curiosity, Ellen shares her knowledge about the history between the Earnshaw…

    • 525 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Divine Wind

    • 556 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Ida Penrose’s homesickness caused quite a bit of concern to the Penrose family as well. Although she once loved her husband, she soon grew weary of the neglect she received from her him. She longed for England deeply, so sometimes she would leave during the day to find solitude, to find her own “bit of England” in Broome. She tried to “Culturelise” her family with English literature, ‘She would push Great Expectations into our hands, and we’d say “too thick, never get through it”.’ After Ida had left, the remaining Penrose family began to wonder as to why she had left,…

    • 556 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Mommie Dearest?

    • 1446 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Godwin opens her short story with an opening sentence that confuses the mood of the parable and confounds the reader. “Once upon a time there was a wife and mother one too many times” (39). Those first four words, the quint-essential opening of every story book fantasy that invokes beautiful imagery of princesses and green forests with colorful gardens and carefree animals and always has a way of overcoming great obstacles to endorse a long and happy life, opens the reader’s mind to a cheerful theme. The next six words present an “ah” moment, eliciting the feeling of comfort and caring that a wife and mother provides. She has extracted emotions of love and adoration that many of us endear with our mothers to passion and intimacy towards our wives. Ms. Godwin has, in the first ten words of her first sentence, devoted the reader to the main character without even mentioning anything about her. We do not know who she is, we do not know where she is, we do not know how she is, but we want to know.…

    • 1446 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The descriptions of Alice Drablow (AD) in a London Particular by Bentley give the impression of a lonely isolated woman. She is described as a ‘rum un’ by Bentley and lived like a recluse at Eel Marsh House when she was alive. Her only family lived abroad in India and had done so for 40 years. She is described as having ‘no friends…

    • 1269 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    One of Flannery O’Connor’s most successful stories, “Good Country People” was published in 1955. “Good Country People” addresses the of good versus evil, the foolishness of intellectual pretensions, and most importantly the theme of reality versus illusion. An important character Mrs. Hopewell’s daughter Hulga, born as Joy has a Ph. D but seems to have no common sense. She allows her self to be tricked by a “Bible salesman” and gets her self in to a binding situation. Good Country people deals with illusion vs. reality this is shown when the author discusses Manley Pointer; the bible sales man, Joy thinking she is ugly, and the fact the Hulga and her mother tend to disagree about Hulga’s life decisions.…

    • 657 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cecelia Everhart was a raven haired beauty who was quite dull and vain. Seated next to her was her husband, Charles, a rather tiny fellow. Weak and unintimidating, he gave off the feeling of a rather poor man; however he was rather malapert and therefore quite rude. Their daughter was an exact replica of her mother, sitting on the edge of her chair and drinking tea with her pinky extended.…

    • 1088 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Mrs. Hopewell is a widow who lives a life dictated by social accuracy and her daughter Joy/Hulga who only lives with her mother in a physical sense. The name "Hopewell" characterizes both Mrs. Hopewell and her daughter. Both women are individuals who simplistically believe that what they want can be had — although each of them is, in her own way, blind to the world as it really exists. Both women fail to see that the world (because it is a fallen world) is a mixture of good and evil. This misperception leads them to assume that the…

    • 1739 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays

Related Topics