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Hughes Langston's When the Negro Was in Vogue: Analysis

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Hughes Langston's When the Negro Was in Vogue: Analysis
TONE, DRAMA, CONCETLY, AUTHORS, PERSPECTIVE

Hughes Langston When the Negro Was in Vague” The Language of Literature pg 932+936

Langston Hughes influence was making stories for people that were not herd.” Hughes was one of the leading voices in the Harlem renascence.

1. When did the Harlem renaissance take place
2. How did many blacks feel about whites who flocked into their clubs
3. Name two African American celebrities to who Hughes relates to

The setting is Harlem
The topic was Harlem Vibrant Night Life
The issues was eye witnesses

The story connects to my life because the author was a great figure in the Harlem renessance and I think that it would have been cool if I lived during that period in time and visited the places and enjoyed what he talked about in the stories

1. The Harlem renaissance took place in the 1920s
2. The blacks did not like white people coming to Harlem to watch them in their clubs
3. Two famous artist he replied too where duke Ellington and Paul Robeson

S the subjects was on the fun times in Harlem
O 1920 Harlem renaissance and its times
A the audience where people explaining how fun the times were
P To reform people what whites, blacks, and the Harlem Renaissance
S The speaker is Langston Hughes

1. The Negros was vogue begins with explain the Harlem renaissance
2. The rant parts and Clark are similar because they were both places to have fun and difficult but the rent parties where more combatable for black people to have fun

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