Hudson River: a Detailed and Comprehensive Geological History

Powerful Essays
Contents
Introduction………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..2 Hudson River Formation……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..5 Hudson Canyon…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………12 Glacial History…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..14 Conclusion…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………17 Bibliography………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………18 Maps & Diagrams…..………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….19 Hudson Canyon……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..19 Geological Processes……………………………………………………………………………………………………….22

1|Page

Introduction
In 1872, a naturalist and surveyor by the name of Verplanck Colvin found the source of the Hudson River. It is a small pond on the south western slope of Mt. Marcy, the highest peak in the Adirondacks, called Lake Tear of the Clouds. So little is Lake Tear of the Clouds that if no water was to feed it for seven days it would be reduced to just an empty basin. Nevertheless, the Hudson starts right in its waters. One could say the Hudson River is divided into two distinct sections differentiated by geology and appearance. The first section winds its way through the Adirondack Mountains spanning 166 miles from Lake Tear of the Clouds to the Federal Dam in Troy. This section is un-navigable by boat and in some places somewhat rapid. The second section, which is quite different from the first, starts at the Federal Dam and runs for 149 miles through the “rolling hills” all the way to the Narrows between Brooklyn and Staten Island. Back up north at Lake Tear of the Clouds is fed by natural springs and runoff from the sheer steepness of Mt. Marcy and other streams winding down from the high peaks of the Adirondacks. Throughout the whole Adirondack mountain range, the watershed drains and dumps runoff from 3,400 foot peaks into the lowlands less than 410 feet above sea level. From Lake Tear of the Clouds [in the space of a mile] the river drops 1,000 feet down a deep trench

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Powerful Essays

    Letchworth State Park

    • 1334 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Hennigan, Robert D. "The Genesee River Drainage Basin, Gorge and Mount Morris Dam." Editorial. Clearwaters Summer 2007: 26-27. Nywea.org. New York Water Environment Association, Inc. Web. 24 Mar. 2013. .…

    • 1334 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Hudson River Dredging

    • 1699 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Much of the evidence found in the area suggests that it might have served as hunting grounds during the inter-glacial periods. However, all the records and evidence is very sketchy. Recorded history of the area began in 1300 AD, many of the records are considered to be legends, but most of them contain consistent internal evidence. " According to the Walom Olum or Red Score of the Lenni-Lenape Indians, they first reached the Atlantic Seaboard only a few hundred years before the period of white discovery c1400 AD. According to Indian epic, the Lenni-Lenape or "Original People" had migrated from very cold Region in the North...in search of the river that flowed both ways, possibly the tidal Hudson."(Adams,…

    • 1699 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    | |area of the Ohio river. The |Nation", 2006). | |elders entrusted to the present and future…

    • 2696 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Stone Walls of New England

    • 2671 Words
    • 11 Pages

    Stonewalls of New England are rich with history and archeologists are still trying to determine who may have built the first stonewalls or if our concept of when North America was first settled is wrong. Items of stone and metal lead archeologists to believe that the archaic period is when the Northern New England portion of America was first inhabited.…

    • 2671 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    For many people it is surprising to wonder how residents of New York City and New Jersey bore the absence of a connecting path between the cities and with the mighty Hudson River in between, traveling was surely an ordeal for the people who had to travel to and from between the two cities. Since the earlier centuries had lacked appropriate technology to build a bridge or other means of transport, the commonest method was by ferry (Lampkin). Hence, people from both the cities had to wait for as long as five or six hours for a ferry to arrive and this time waste was additional with the occasional presence of ice present in the middle of the…

    • 1705 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Cuyahoga River

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Cuyahoga River is located in northeastern Ohio running through the major cities of Cleveland and Akron. The river is 100 miles long and empties into Lake Erie. It was said to be formed by the advancement and retreat of ice sheets during the ice age. The final retreat caused the river to flow north ward which had flowed southward before. (Michael)…

    • 984 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Mohawk town of Caughnawaga (“Sault St. Louis”) on the St. Lawrence River, c. 1750.…

    • 753 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    region were of English descent, however, both emerged to be very different societies by 1700.…

    • 920 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    During the1630s, the Pequots resided in the Connecticut River Valley, which was a fertile land wanted by the colonizers from the Plymouth and Massachusetts…

    • 650 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    The Goal

    • 2918 Words
    • 12 Pages

    Goldratt, E. M. & Cox, J. 2004. The Goal. Great Barrington, MA: The North River…

    • 2918 Words
    • 12 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    1. Flourished between 1670-1840s, important spur to the exploration of w.-B.+F. First to explore W. In search of beaver pelt-depended on N.A.(Cree,Assiniboins&Blackfeet)-creating metis-B. Dominated fur trade-A. Wanted to challenge it-Lewis&Clark expedition& “rendezvous”system by 1820s of Rocky M. Fur Company by Ashley-met at appointed location to trade- loud,polyglot&many-day affair w/ many nations.…

    • 2578 Words
    • 11 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Better Essays

    Middlemen in the Lands Southwest of Hudson Bay, 1660-1870. Toronto: U of Toronto, 1974. Print.…

    • 1108 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    History of the Erie Canal

    • 7806 Words
    • 32 Pages

    Throughout history, the United States has discovered ways to adapt to change through the use of technology and design related to the transportation industry and has effectively overcome obstacles in order to fulfill the needs of society. To modernize the country, new ideas, plans, and designs have been developed, over time, to support the vastly growing economy and population. Our nation’s growth can be directly traced back to new forms of technology invented, developed, and reproduced for society. Three different types of transportation systems/designs that were extremely crucial and revolutionized society, over the ages, are canals (especially the Erie…

    • 7806 Words
    • 32 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    Author William Cronon, Changes in the Land is a book that gives a detailed analysis on what life was like in the New England colony when the settlers first arrived. Cronon describes many things that the settlers experienced when they arrived over into New England and how it differed from England. Cronon discusses Indian relationships and how each group had different customs. In the book Cronon describes the landscape and how everyone was able to benefit from it. Cronon’s thesis is “the shift from Indian to European dominance in New England entailed important changes--well known to historians--in the…

    • 1723 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    About two million years ago we entered into the Pleistocene Epoch, an ice age that lasted until about 12,000 years ago and covered all of North America in over 6,000 feet of snow and ice. During this time, the temperatures went up and down causing the glaciers to melt or to expand, often times causing them to move. This carved the landscape of Michigan (Why). Glacial erosion can happen in two primary ways, the first is called plucking, and this happens when rocks and debris stick to the underside of a glacier and then are carried off with it. The second is called abrasion, this is more of what we might think on when we think of erosion, it’s what happens when two pieces of hard material scrape against each other. It is described almost as sanding the earth with a very large piece of sandpaper. When glaciers pick up a boulders or other debris and move it to another place, this is called glacial transportation. Often this transported debris has a different make up than the bedrock on which it has been distributed (Glacial erosion). These accumulations of glacial debris are called a moraines. Moraines are fairly common in Michigan and they are formed when a glacier either pauses for a good amount of time or begins to retreat. One remarkable moraine in Michigan is the Port Huron Moraine that is pictured below. Of course moraines are not the only landform in Michigan that has been shaped by glaciers (Moraines). There are many more landforms that are formed by glaciers. One in particular are drumlins. Drumlins are long features that can be up to 5 kilometers long and 50 meters high. One end usually has a very steep incline while the other end tapers off in an easy incline .The main theory on exactly how drumlins are formed is essentially that when a glacier becomes too overloaded with sediment and debris, that is deposits it in the form of a…

    • 1652 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays