Huckleberry Finn Relationship

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Mark Twain’s The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn novel centers around the adventures of an imaginative, and impressionable young white boy, Huck, and an illiterate—albeit wise and paternal—black slave, Jim. The relationship between these two characters change and develop all throughout the entirety of the novel. A pairing that I find relatable, although not without its stark differences, is the relationship between the two main characters in the hit show, Breaking Bad, created by Vince Gilligan. The show’s protagonists are Jesse Pinkman, a street-smart drug dealer who’s down on his luck at the beginning of the series, and Walter White, a middle-aged chemistry teacher and family man who has recently found out he has lung cancer and must find …show more content…
For the most part, he’s formally uneducated, but very imaginative and independent. Huck lives life without really having much guidance or having an elder that he can look up to. Jesse Pinkman, one of the protagonists in Breaking Bad, shares a few common characteristics with Huck, being that he also is very independent and has little to no guidance at the beginning of the series. In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Jim, serves as the only reasonable adult figure for Huck, as Huck’s own father is a miserable drunk and a generally bad person. In Breaking Bad, Walter White serves as the paternal figure to Jesse in many ways, often protecting him from danger and teaching him important lessons throughout the …show more content…
In The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Huck and Jim have been shown to protect one another in the face of adversity and/or danger. An example of this is when Jim sees the dead body of Huck’s father and does not allow Huck to get a close look at Pap’s face, for Jim did not want Huck to know his Pap was the one who had died. Jim acts as a parental figure for Huck, something that Huck does not get with his own biological father. In Breaking Bad, Walter and Jesse do not immediately start off on the friendliest of terms, but throughout the series, the two grow a strong friendship and pull each other from dangerous situations on more than a couple occasions. An example of this is when Jesse goes to a local top drug distributor, and wants to show off the methamphetamine that he and Walter “cooked” in hopes of making more money. Tuco, the drug distributor, is a highly unpredictable and violent criminal. Impressed by the quality of the methamphetamine, he offers to pay for the product at a later time. Not convinced that Tuco is a man who should be trusted, Jesse tries to book it and escape with the product. Tuco then feels disrespected and beats Jesse to a pulp. After Walter sees the aftermath of Jesse’s beatdown, he decides to take matters into his own hands. Walter visits Tuco in the same place that Jesse had met him prior, with more “meth,” and asks for even more money than what was previously mentioned, the

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