Huckleberry Finn And Jim's Relationship

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Huckleberry Finn is born and raised in Southern, Missouri in the late 1800’s. The white supremacist society is cruel towards black people, dehumanizing them and forcing them into slavery. The relationship between the two is quite unusual, but strangely similar. Jim is a grown black man, enslaved by Miss Watson. When he hears he’s going to be sold he flees and runs into Huck, a young white boy in a similar situation. He had run away from his abusive drunken father to escape being tormented and harmed every day. Huck is raised to believe such things, but is naïve about this fault; he is not affected since he is a white boy raised by white caretakers. He is still new to this world, and needs to learn more from it. Later after his father kidnapped him, he fakes his own death and runs away from the shed in the woods. While running away to the nearest island, he runs into a familiar man, Jim the slave of his caretaker Miss Watson. Huck is relieved to find Jim; he didn’t feel so lonely anymore, “I was so glad to see Jim. I wasn’t lonesome now.” …show more content…
Huck learns the faults of society that it has on people like Jim, and how wrong they are. Their bonds as friends strengthen and it changes Huck’s views on what he thinks is right and wrong. One example of building trust was when Huck thought that turning Jim in would be the right thing to do, so he went out on the raft to go find someone. But, when Huck encountered a man who asked him if he saw a black man (Jim) in the forest, he didn’t feel like it was right anymore. He realized he could put Jim in even more danger, not to mention he doesn’t want to lose his friend. So he told the authority that he saw a white man, not a black man. This action protects Jim’s whereabouts. Jim was also hiding in the background watching for Huck’s answer, and when he heard Huck’s response he was so relieved. He gained more trust in Huck, and Huck gained more loyalty to

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