How write a compare contrast essay

Topics: Essay, Writing, Academia, Thesis or dissertation / Pages: 6 (1372 words) / Published: Dec 21st, 2013
How to Write a Compare-Contrast Essay

The Elements of a Compare-Contrast Essay
What is comparison?
Explaining the similarities or points of connection between two ideas, people, or things to give the reader a deeper understanding of each

What is contrasting?
Explaining the differences or points of disconnection between two ideas, people, or things to give the reader a deeper understanding of each

Adapted from Webster’s Third New International Dictionary

On what subjects can I write a successful compare-contrast essay?

Your subjects will need to each be significant in their own right to merit discussion. They will also need to have some sort of relationship to each other so that showing them side by side allows the reader to learn more about each. In other words, there must be a reason to compare them. Here are some reasons to compare and contrast.
To consider two subjects side by side and show their distinctions.
To choose between two things.
To explain one subject in terms of another.

What are the types of compare-contrast essays?

Writing Strategies for a Persuasive Essay

1. Read the question or essay prompt. Identify your topics and be sure that you understand what each really is. You may need to do a little research to be clear on this.
2. Decide what your purpose for writing is (to show distinctions, to choose, to explain).
3. Develop a thesis statement. Remember that a thesis statement must be more than “X and Y have many differences and similarities.” Your thesis should reflect which purpose you chose. Example: “Examining the similarities and differences between the work of Hemingway and Fitzgerald allows us to see how the contexts of their lives affected their work.”
4. Decide what your points of similarity (connection) and difference (disconnection) will be.
5. Research! Find relevant, credible publications, web sites, and individuals that offer evidence that supports your thesis and chosen points of



Citations: speculation – trying to predict what will happen if an action is taken or an idea is accepted Source: Jane Schaeffer Publications, Style Analysis (1998) Source: Kirszner and Mandell (1998).

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