How to Write a Thesis Paper

Topics: Citation, Logic, Marketing Pages: 11 (2948 words) Published: October 28, 2014
Stake out a clear, complex position (a thesis) with tension that establishes that position as a possible position within a broader range of possibilities. Introductions should offer enough context for readers to understand the problem to which you are responding by taking your position and the broader conversation (in general) within which you are participating. Development needs to be consistent and progressive, not repetitive. Organization needs to be clear and visible. Closed-form features that mark the organization—a forecasting statement (possibly), clear transitions, and strong topic sentences should facilitate reading, as should a logical method of presenting information and advancing the argument. Research should be fully integrated into the paper, with secondary research providing the bulk of your evidence. Evidence should be used responsibly and should be sufficient to the task to which you put it. Integrated research should be richly contextualized and fully explained/analyzed. Sources should not dominate your paper’s argument—your argument should be the chief organizer. Sources should be varied, with at least a few from scholarly sources (professional/academic journals or monographs). Source material should be contextualized and fairly represented. Grammar and mechanics should be rock solid in final draft form—these should not distract the read. Style should be fluid and sophisticated, varied and appropriate to the task. The essay should hew closely to the conventions of your chosen style—MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.—throughout. References should be appropriately enumerated as per the guidelines of your chosen style, and in-text citations should be visible and consistent in keeping with said style. All uses of outside sources should be indicated/documented. Stake out a clear, complex position (a thesis) with tension that establishes that position as a possible position within a broader range of possibilities. Introductions should offer enough context for readers to understand the problem to which you are responding by taking your position and the broader conversation (in general) within which you are participating. Development needs to be consistent and progressive, not repetitive. Organization needs to be clear and visible. Closed-form features that mark the organization—a forecasting statement (possibly), clear transitions, and strong topic sentences should facilitate reading, as should a logical method of presenting information and advancing the argument. Research should be fully integrated into the paper, with secondary research providing the bulk of your evidence. Evidence should be used responsibly and should be sufficient to the task to which you put it. Integrated research should be richly contextualized and fully explained/analyzed. Sources should not dominate your paper’s argument—your argument should be the chief organizer. Sources should be varied, with at least a few from scholarly sources (professional/academic journals or monographs). Source material should be contextualized and fairly represented. Grammar and mechanics should be rock solid in final draft form—these should not distract the read. Style should be fluid and sophisticated, varied and appropriate to the task. The essay should hew closely to the conventions of your chosen style—MLA, APA, Chicago, etc.—throughout. References should be appropriately enumerated as per the guidelines of your chosen style, and in-text citations should be visible and consistent in keeping with said style. All uses of outside sources should be indicated/documented. Stake out a clear, complex position (a thesis) with tension that establishes that position as a possible position within a broader range of possibilities. Introductions should offer enough context for readers to understand the problem to which you are responding by taking your position and the broader conversation (in general) within which you are participating. Development needs to be consistent and...

References: should be appropriately enumerated as per the guidelines of your chosen style, and in-text citations should be visible and consistent in keeping with said style. All uses of outside sources should be indicated/documented.
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