how to build the market

Topics: Toyota, General Motors, Plug-in hybrid Pages: 69 (8944 words) Published: July 13, 2014
ACKNOWLEDGEMENT

I would like to thank Toyota Motors Corporation, for constant guidance to conduct the present arduous project and untiring cooperation which he extended to me throughout the duration of my summer training. I am thankful to Mr. Philips for allowing me to do summer training and for this constructive intervention and encouragement. My special thanks are for those who spared time for providing information and responding to the questionnaire.

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER 1: - INTRODUCTION

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
OBJECTIVE OF STUDY
SCOPE OF STUDY

CHAPTER 2: - COMPANY PROFILE
CAR MODELS
OVERVIEW
CORPORATE DATA
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
PERCEPTS
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
LOCATION
MANUFACTURING SUBSIDIARIES & AFFILIATES
GROWTH
MARKET SHARE
COMPETITORS

CHAPTER 3: - MARKETING STRATEGIES
PRODUCTS
PRICE
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION

CHAPTER 4: - RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
TYPE OF DATA
SAMPLE SIZE AND AREAS COVERED
STATISTICAL AND PRESENTATION TOOLS USED
LIMITATIONS OF STUDY

CHAPTER 5: - CONCLUSION & RECOMMENDATIONS

CHAPTER 7: - ANNEXURE
BIBLIOGRAPHY

Introduction

Automobile, self-propelled vehicle used primarily on public roads but adaptable to other surfaces. Automobiles changed the world during the 20th century, particularly in the United States and other industrialized nations. From the growth of suburbs to the development of elaborate road and highway systems, the so-called horseless carriage has forever altered the modern landscape. The manufacture, sale, and servicing of automobiles have become key elements of industrial economies. But along with greater mobility and job creation, the automobile has brought noise and air pollution, and automobile accidents rank among the leading causes of death and injury throughout the world. But for better or worse, the 1900s can be called the Age of the Automobile and cars will no doubt continue to shape our culture and economy well into the 21st century.

Automobiles are classified by size, style, number of doors, and intended use. The typical automobile, also called a car, auto, motorcar, and passenger car, has four wheels and can carry up to six people, including a driver. Larger vehicles designed to carry more passengers are called vans, minivans, omnibuses, or buses. Those used to carry cargo are called pickups or trucks, depending on their size and design. Minivans are van-style vehicles built on a passenger car frame that can usually carry up to eight passengers. Sport-utility vehicles, also known as SUVs, are more rugged than passenger cars and are designed for driving in mud or snow.

Auto manufacturing plants in 40 countries produced a total of 63.9 million vehicles, including 42.8 million passenger cars, in 2004, according to Ward’s Auto, an auto industry analyst. About 16.2 million vehicles, including 6.3 million passenger cars, were produced in North America in 2004. For information on the business of making cars, see Automobile Industry.

The automobile is built around an engine. Various systems supply the engine with fuel, cool it during operation, lubricate its moving parts, and remove exhaust gases it creates. The engine produces mechanical power that is transmitted to the automobile’s wheels through a drive train, which includes a transmission, one or more drive shafts, a differential gear, and axles. Suspension systems, which include springs and shock absorbers, cushion the ride and help protect the vehicle from being damaged by bumps, heavy loads, and other stresses. Wheels and tires support the vehicle on the roadway and, when rotated by powered axles, propel the vehicle forward or backward. Steering and braking systems provide control over direction and speed. An electrical system starts and operates the engine,...


Bibliography: Books referred: -
Marketing Management 30th editon - Philip Kotler
Marketing Management 2005 - T. N. Chabra
Marketing Management 2006 - C. B. Gupta
Web Sites: -
Google search engine
www.toyota private limited.com
www.yahoo.com
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