How significant was the impact of WW1 in causing the February 1917 revolution?

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How significant was the impact of WW1 in causing the February 1917 revolution?
On the 27th of February 1917, Nicholas II received a telegraph. Rodzianko, the President of the Duma, was trying to urge him into action, stating “any procrastination is fatal”, the situation was moving into “a state of anarchy” and “the government is paralysed”. The grave circumstances included a break-down in the transportation system and the supply of necessities, fuel and food. Sporadic firing plagued the streets. The next day, the Czar abdicated. Thus the February revolution characterizes Russian history, as it provoked the Czarist demise. Several historians rely on the ‘optimist’ view alleging the October Manifesto had set Russia on the course of political modernisation and Russian agriculture and industry were also modernising meaning WWI was the spark that ignited the 1917 revolution. The ‘pessimist’ notion entails the theory that there were abundant contributory elements, and Czarism was doomed despite the October Manifesto and Stolypin’s agricultural reforms. ‘Optimists’ offer several reasons as to how WWI incited the Revolution. Strike actions and disillusionment spread with “absolute ruin everywhere” , and, according to an Okhrana report in January 1917, crucially just before the Revolution, an openly hostile attitude “towards the Government and protest with all the means at their disposal against the continuation of the war” had been established. This report illuminates difficult living conditions caused by war, with “the proletariat of the capital on the verge of despair”, and the “wildest excesses of a hunger riot” . This account is relatively reliable, because conversant to Nicholas, publication was never intended. Presumably, their description is impartial; however, the consistency depends on their quality of work, as one assumes the Okhrana encompassed a decent perception of affairs. The Okhrana, albeit upholding their reputation of mercilessness, were repeatedly

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