How Revolutionary Was The American Revolution Dbq Analysis

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How Revoltuionary Was the American Revolution?

The American Revolution was not Revoutionary because I believe that it was more than just the Revolution that change our country. The War for Independence took place between 1775 and 1783. There were many changes, both socially and in legistlation, but not intill 1860 to 1877. The American Revolution was not Revolutionary because All men were not created equal, Whitemen held power, and Poverty Among the People. On July 4th, 1776, the Declaration of Independence was written and it stated that "All men are created equal, that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness." The Declaration of Independece served two purposes at the time, it set for the proper function of government and the causes of separation from the King of England. I believe that the Declaration wasn't towards everyone. In Document 9, the "Utmost Good Faith" clause from the Northwest Ordiance in 1787 was written that the Native American land won't be taken from them unless they rebel the Government. Document 10
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In Document 5, the abolition of slavery was a dramatic change but slavery still occur after the Civil War. Every other states besides the 13th colonies still had slaves around. The south were force to give up slave and the federal goverment in Northwest ordinate did not want slaves. Document 6 is a speech written in 1819, 30 years after the Revolution was made by a young African - American who was valedictorian of his New York free school. The young man was wondering how he will use his knowledge and skills after graduating high school without being push away by the color of his skin. In his speech he said "No one will employ me; white boys won't work with me" and "White clerks won't associate with me." He felt that his only option were normal labor services, which is not much different from slavery. Color was still an issue to the

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