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How Does Racism Affect The Civil Rights Movement?

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How Does Racism Affect The Civil Rights Movement?
Over the past Decade the word racism has become one of the most argued words since the civil rights movement. Only the difference is the black population didn’t have the same rights as the white population. There were peaceful protest all throughout the country, and the police force responded with brutal and unnecessary violence. There were still blacks working on farms picking cotton only difference was they were getting paid enough to support themselves not even mentioning their families. Interracial marriage was frowned upon and for the longest time was considered an invalid marriage in the eyes of the south states.
Most experts all agree that racism is a basic reactive motive that a group of people have. As well as using racism to make
…show more content…
Another thing being that nowhere does the organization protest against black on black violence. In their website on the about page they use very odd trigger phrases “like liberation of our people’’ and “humanization of Black lives” their entire website is using these phrases to literally give people the ideology that they aren't even being treated as humans by the majorities and that the need a liberation. Since when did people start treating blacks like dogs and dehumanizing …show more content…
Which is why we as a society have such a hard time grasping how to end racism but the problem is racism is such a complex word everyone in the world has their own 5 page essay on what they think it means. My intentions were not to sway anyone to what they think is right or wrong but to give shine the light on such a sensitive and dangerous topic with today’s day and age. Don’t stand up for something if you don't truly understand what that certain thing means. And always stop and think, do I truly believe in why I am doing

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