How Does Okonkwo Have Good Intentions In Things Fall Apart

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Okonkwo has good intentions, but what is seen as good hurts him and everyone around him. Being feminine is seen as weak and is shunned upon. Beatings are often used to discipline children and wives, causing them to fear the ones who are supposed to protect them. Igbo culture is surrounded by fear and swift punishments that doesn’t let anyone think for themselves. Igbo culture

Okonkwo’s father caused him to have a strong fear of becoming like his father.“Perhaps down in his heart Okonkwo was not a cruel man. But his whole life was dominated by fear, the fear of failure and of weakness... It was not external but lay deep within himself. It was the fear of himself, lest he should be found to resemble his father.” This shows that his aggression towards his wives and children is influenced by him not wanting to be soft. His father caused him to become a workaholic who doesn’t show any emotion.
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Okonkwo states that, “If Ezinma had been a boy I would have been happier. She has the right spirit.”. This is evidence that Okonkwo would treat his daughter with the respect of a boy if he could. It affects him because he knows that women don’t have a significant role besides farming or being a

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