How Did William Cronon Change In New England

Better Essays
6161-78701-HIST-1301
Sharonda Hicks
Houston Community College
Dr. Michael McCormick
October 12, 2015

William Cronon: Changes in the Land
Author William Cronon, Changes in the Land is a book that gives a detailed analysis on what life was like in the New England colony when the settlers first arrived. Cronon describes many things that the settlers experienced when they arrived over into New England and how it differed from England. Cronon discusses Indian relationships and how each group had different customs. In the book Cronon describes the landscape and how everyone was able to benefit from it. Cronon’s thesis is “the shift from Indian to European dominance in New England entailed important changes--well known to historians--in the
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This wood supply was very important to the settlers because it would be how they would build and supply heat. Beside from wood, the amount of fish and birds that the settlers also were able to catch was in great abundance. “Nothing in their English experience prepared these men for the sigh of such prodigious quantities of fish.”(pg 65)Although, the settlers wood supply was high,and there was an abundance of fish and birds they still had trouble surviving through tough times because of the difference in landscape and they had a short number of supplies to get them through, because they were not prepared for the winters that New England brought upon …show more content…
“European grazing animals which constituted a heavier burden on New England soil.”(pg 385) More of the forest had been completely wiped out so that the Europeans can begin to create communities and villages on the land and for more grain production. Diseases traveled a lot faster and were much deadly to the Indians. “Livestock whether raised for market or for home consumption were themselves a major reason for the dispersal of colonial settlements. Ecological pressures brought on by overgrazing and inadequate forage reinforce economic incentives flowing more directly from market demand.”(pg 391) New England was becoming more Capital and finding more ways to bring in

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