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How Did Thomas Paine Influence Religion

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How Did Thomas Paine Influence Religion
Thomas Paine (1937-1809) was 72 years of age when he passed, he was born in England and was an influential 18th-century author. He was an English writer not only of essays but pamphlets too, among them included, “Common Sense,” which was one of his most influential pieces, “Rights of Man,” a piece where he defended the French Revolution; and “The Age of Reason,” regarding his place of religion in society. Thomas Paine brought his ideas to a huge audience, confusing the public opinions and views of the people in Britain. His writings didn’t only influence the British, but also influenced the American Revolution and helped open way for the Declaration of Independence.
Knowing the political views, religious views, and environment that surrounded Paine is important since it can clue out why Paine believed in what he believed in. His birth towards the end of the Enlightenment meant that it influenced his ideas, thoughts and discoveries. Paine happened to be in England when the French Revolution began in 1789. Later in his life, Paine spurred out his views on religion, especially regarding Christianity. The Age of Reason created a stir since he challenges about both Christianity and the Bible, and the legitimacy of both. It was at first released in three parts as pamphlets.
Thomas Paine was very frequently called an atheist, but he actually showed a lot of confidence in the divine order of the creation. The God that Paine believed in was mainly
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He believed in God, that God was the creator of the universe and everything in existence. But he still had his major doubts about the Bible, the Koran, Christianity and the Turkish church. To him life and religion was a labyrinth, but more than that it was more of a laboratory for discovery and for testing logical theories suited with the good of society. That for Paine was the true path to God and to the participation in the

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