How Did The Women's Movement Affect The Civil Rights Movement

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The Civil Rights movement increased the number of women organizations that women, especially women of color, could attend. Black communities became increasingly diverse, appearing in urban and rural areas, in northern and southern United States. Black women often worked outside of their homes, usually working to better their communities. They were often involved in community and religious groups. As the women’s movement continued black women started to see more opportunities become available to them. Jobs that were previously worked by white women were now accepting black women. Black activists focused on suffrage, even though blacks had gained the ability to vote, many weren’t made aware, or were still discouraged from participating. Sometimes

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