How Did The Whitlam Government Contribute To Reform Australia

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WHITLAM GOVERNMENT RESPONSE

The Whitlam government made a significant contribution to social reform in Australia through the implementation of key domestic policies. These domestic policies focused on promoting social equality for various minority groups, which had suffered injustice in the past. These groups included Aboriginals, women and migrants. This is reinforced through the Whitlam government establishing the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Land Rights, introducing self- determination, implementing the Racial Discrimination Act and giving Aboriginals the same rights as other Australians. The government successfully introduced multiculturalism, which accepts cultural and ethnic differences within society, by abolishing assimilation
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Whitlam also established the Family Law Act, which would make it easier for women in custody and property disputes after leaving an abusive relationship. Another successful reform implemented by the Whitlam government was increased spending on education and the abolishment of university fees. Whitlam believed that increasing support for education helped achieve equality, therefore he established the Australian Schools Commission to fund students so they can have access to key educational resources. He abolished higher education fees and took over responsibility for funding universities of advanced education. Whitlam’s education policies helped improve the quality of education and fostered opportunity for all Australians. The Whitlam government introduced Medicare in 1975. This benefited Australians as it meant professional health care workers worked for a salary, there was a development of community health services and it allowed patients to visit the doctor without paying a consultation fee. Whitlam also abolished conscription for national service and releasing draft dodgers from prison. Through the implementation of key domestic reforms, the Whitlam government was able to remove barriers, which encouraged discrimination by developing policies, and legislation, which promoted social

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