How Did The Influenza Pandemic Break Out In 1918

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Topics: Influenza
The Immune Killer The influenza pandemic broke out in 1918 around the end of World War 1 and spread around the world reaching islands and villages. The virus infected anyone it could and killed millions of people. People say that since the virus targeted the immune system it was harder to treat and get antibiotics to help people. This article describes how it was just not the right time for a flu breakout due to getting over war and not having the cure for it. Weird enough people with the strongest immune systems were the ones being infected by the influenza virus. Doctors were helpless during the influenza epidemic due to the fact it was infecting the immune system in the younger adults. Scientist were shocked to find so many causes that could have made this outbreak happen. Scientists believed that this virus mostly infected people with strong immune systems and in younger adults. “That led some scientists to suggest that the 1918 flu virus set off a lethal overreaction (Zimmer 2014).” Stronger immune systems were among people that were in their early 20s and they had a less chance of dying. The reason for it affecting the immune system was due to the virus cells …show more content…
How did it affect all of these people and why? They left out the most important facts about how this death rate was so high and so traumatizing. It also gave many opinions on what could have happened during this time but they didn’t have enough evidence from 1918 to prove anything is true. It talked about how young adults were targeted during this time but never gave more facts on why them. This could be humans shaping the environment because they are trying to hide one of the deadliest disasters that still happens today. Humans are trying to make this seem that they just weren’t prepared but if flu was still a big problem back then why couldn’t they be prepared with

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