How Did Nazi Laws Affect The Lives Of The Jewish People In The 1930s

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Nazi laws aimed to remove the civil and economical rights of Jews in the 1930s. They wanted to create a biologically pure generation of people who had blonde haired and blue eyed. To be a Jew, you had anything but blonde hair and blue eyes. On November 15, 1938, German Jewish children were prohibited from attending German schools, and were banned from parks, pools, or any other public places. Children died, were hidden, rescued, starved, gassed, shot, orphaned, and experimented to create a pure generation with no Jews. The Germans and their collaborators killed as many as 1.5 children. This number consisted of over a million Jewish children and thousands or gypsy, polish children, and German children with disabilities. If the children weren't killed they would most likely be used for forced labor. They would either be worked to death to benefit the camp or do unnecessary jobs like digging ditches. Jewish men, women, and children were rounded up and …show more content…
Many children escaped with parents or other relatives—and sometimes on their own—to family camps run by Jewish partisans. Some Jews hid in attics, cellars, or barns and or took false identities. Some non-Jews hid Jews, but that wasn't exactly the end of it. “. . . 80% of The hidden children that were interviewed were well treated by their rescuers, while 15% were occasionally mistreated, and 5% were treated badly” (The Jewish victims of he holocaust: the children). Not only that but after the war was done, most of the surviving children were orphaned. Sometimes the families would come to get the children after the war, but they found out that their children had disappeared, were killed, or the rescuer got too attached to the child and would not give them back to the families. Some children lived on the streets and begged for bread, but winter would get the best of them, and they would end up getting sick, or they froze to

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