How Did Malcolm X Impact The Civil Rights Movement

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During the early 1950s to late 60s one of the most important events to American history was happening, The Civil Rights Movement. There were many important people to the movement like MLK, Ruby Bridges and the Little Rock Nine, and then, there was Malcolm X. Malcolm at the time had an unorthodox approach to things, while most were preaching nonviolence Malcolm said “by any means necessary”, which caused the two groups to clash. Malcolm often criticized the movement and its leader calling them “stooges” and “chumps”. The leaders denounced his as well saying that he was an irresponsible extremist, and that he did not represent African Americans. Although his speeches had a huge effect on people, especially those tired of being told to wait, …show more content…
The first time the american public became aware of Malcolm was during what was to be known as the Hilton Johnson incident. The incident happened when one night Johnson and two other members of the NOI saw a police officers beating an African-American man and they shouted “You're not in Alabama...this is New York!". That comment caused all three of them to be arrested and Johnson was severely beaten. When the new reached Malcolm he insisted on seeing Johnson, and by the time his request was granted around four thousand people had gathered outside the police station, and with one signal from Malcolm they immediately dispersed. He soon became a media magnet after being featured on a weeklong television show called “The Hate that Hate Produced”. He was soon faced with the awkward reality that he was more famous than his mentor and the leader of NOI, Elijah Muhammad. Soon the FBI was starting to get curious and they secretly infiltrated the NOI’s headquarters and placed bugs, wiretaps and cameras of everything in the building. Malcolm inspired many people one of those being boxer Cassius Clay, (later known as Muhammad Ali) to join the Nation of Islam. In 1962 to 1963 there were multiple events that caused Malcolm to leave the NOI. One being that Malcolm was frustrated that the nation do not do anything about the LAPD’s

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