How Did Lincoln's Law To End Slavery

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Most people know that Lincoln was the 16th president and he was nice, but also Lincoln had a small family. Lincolns child hood just stunk. When Lincoln became president, he became the 16th president. When Lincoln tried ending slavery Lincoln made a law to end slavery. Lincoln’s child hold is interesting and when he grew up he was the 16th president and then he ended slavery.

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