Preview

How Did Jazz Develop

Powerful Essays
Open Document
Open Document
1516 Words
Grammar
Grammar
Plagiarism
Plagiarism
Writing
Writing
Score
Score
How Did Jazz Develop
The earliest times in jazz had been looked more of an art because of the new techniques more expansive harmonies, expansive harmonies, and more. Breaking through the swing era, modern jazz became an outbreak with its complex harmonies one would actually say that modern jazz was influenced by the drastic changes in the swing era. Expecting the role of entertainment African Americans dominated jazz even with racism boiling and hate crimes trending white bands would still manage to incorporate African devices and adopt the melodies and practices. The swing era was coming to a drastic halt due to the war, many people would say that swing had actually become the soundtrack to the war. Due to many men being drafted it took a huge toll on the music …show more content…
This evolved Bebop, bebop is a style of jazz with its fast tempos and exotic sounds soloist are given an opportunity to express their emotions through improvising. Also called bop, bop was a genre that survived in the interstices of the jazz world. The coming and going was not announced in the newspapers nor was it a household name, it wasn’t collected by record companies the music came from mostly tapes or discs made by amateur engineers, bebop was an underground movement it rebelled against the swing era. With the form of a small combo consisting the trumpet saxophone piano drums and bass the musicians took off with improvised lines getting faster and more complex many other bands couldn’t copy someone’s piece now. The syncopations and dotted eighth notes that had characterized earlier jazz were now far less prominent. Making melody statements bebop would consist of artist playing a melody followed by a solo from the trumpet and maybe even a duet with the trumpet and the saxophone this gave soloist a variety of form, ranges and techniques. drummers used more of the cymbals and hi-hat, bass players were the ones who kept the beat, pianist were able to use a lighter touch. To further make sense of the bebop revolution I’ll introduced the famous bebop players who transformed the music and who’s music is still played today. starting with Charlie Parker who was considered to be the founder of bebop, he brought a new level of harmonic and melodic to jazz. His music was different which brought a lot of problems at first but he became one of the most important jazz players still to this day.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    A key similarity between jazz and hip-hop is that they were both started by young African-Americans, who had nowhere else to turn but music. Jazz entered the United States at the turn of the 20th century in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. It only emerged after the introduction of the Jim Crow laws though. Before this, third-class black musicians played ragtime and blues, while the then superior second-class self-proclaimed creoles of color (light-skinned blacks of European decent) played more formal marching band type music, as they were above their fully African-American counterparts. This all changed with the introduction of Jim Crow, which said that all African-Americans, no matter how black they actually were, were second-class citizens. After, both communities combined their sounds and fused together to create the first sounds of jazz. Consequently, as jazz became popular amongst the African-Americans, it became unpopular in the eyes of the superior white community. The first places where jazz was being played was…

    • 811 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Jazz Age

    • 913 Words
    • 4 Pages

    The Jazz Age was a defining point in the history of America. This point in time defined the clear division between the older and younger generations of America. The Jazz Age was more than just a time period but a cultural movement. Although African-Americans receive credit for the introduction of this music into America, it had quickly expanded to the white middle class and further erupted from there. The introduction of this new style of music resulted in the younger generation of America at the time to become rebellious and less inclined to follow in their ancestors footsteps culture wise (Boundless). Jazz music, in its beginnings, was most often played in cities such as New York, Chicago, and New Orleans. Each city boasted its own unique…

    • 913 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Bebop Jazz History

    • 1031 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Bebop jazz, which "slowly evolved from late swing and transition period jazz" (Jazz and the Beat Generation), was quite a shock to the white population when it first appeared on the scene during the Depression. This intricate compilation of sounds became the staple for all that was anti-commercial and as much a part of African-American roots as possible. The reason for such separation between blacks and whites when bebop became so popular is that white musicians were in it for the commercial success, seeing no other reason to play jazz but for financial gain and recognition. Blacks, on the other hand, turned bebop jazz into a personal expression devoid of as much materialistic impression as possible. This new attitude caused great dissent…

    • 1031 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Swing Music Essay

    • 1004 Words
    • 5 Pages

    Jazz first originated in the early 1900s. Jazz didn’t just miraculously emerge as the defining music of the time however. It was a product of various emotions and cultures that reflected the attitude of society that manifested into jazz. Jazz was an improvisation. The 1920s is most commonly thought of as the jazz age as a result of how renowned it became. The improvisational character of the music reflected the relaxed social codes, and loose morals of the time. Furthermore, Jazz is most often associated with the changing role of…

    • 1004 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    America in the 1920s saw many instances of drastic change, impacting the lives of many Americans. The Roaring Twenties brought about many new inventions, wealth, and a new outlook on the common American lifestyle. With these new times came new influences and much change to the musical industry of jazz. This investigation will study the evolution of jazz music in the rapidly changing times of America in the 1920s and how the new American lifestyle and optimistic times influenced the music. Two sources that are used in this investigation are Jazz from its Origins to the Present by Lewis Porter, Michael Ullman, and Edward Hazell, and Chicago Jazz: A Cultural History by William Howland Kenney and published in 1993, which will be evaluated for their origins, purposes, values and limitations.…

    • 1921 Words
    • 8 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Jazz Music Essay

    • 1583 Words
    • 7 Pages

    Louis Armstrong, an influential figure in the Jazz world, once said, “If you have to ask what jazz is, you’ll never know.” Over time, jazz has kept its essential elements and original style, even as new styles have developed. Jazz, in its most basic form, is defined as “music that includes qualities such as swing, improvising, group interaction, developing an 'individual voice', and being open to different musical possibilities,” by Travis Jackson, a Professor of American Music. Improvisation, being the key element in every type of jazz, must be present for a piece to be considered jazz music. This element turns jazz musicians into composers and is essential to jazz styles of music. Another thing unique to jazz is its approach to rhythm. The…

    • 1583 Words
    • 7 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Swing deteriorated its fame in the World War II due to various influences. In the late 1940’s, swing changed to traditional pop music or evolved to new genres, like blues and bebop. It began to revive again in the 1950’s, with artists like Frank…

    • 668 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Jazz Age was a cultural movement that began around 1918, post WWI. It was born in New Orleans but later spread around the world, it was a beautiful mixture of jazz and march banding styled music and was often played by African-Americans. It was the first time that people began to move to the cities rather than in rural areas. It was the first time that African American were given the opportunity to progress in a society that failed them since the ending our slavery. After the war, new trends began to surface, for example: dancing, music, fashion, theater and all the other arts in an attempt to help ease the post-war feeling of the nation.…

    • 359 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jazz was created from African Americans and evolved more and more over time. White people in the middle-class came to enjoy the music. This helped combine the ideals of African Americans with the White people of America.…

    • 706 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Jazz Music Influence

    • 223 Words
    • 1 Page

    The birth of jazz music is often accredited to African Americans but both black and white Americans are responsible for its immerse rise in popularity. It is present in black vocals, music-spirituals, work songs, field hollers, and the blues. Jazz united people across the world and had powerful meanings about their lives. Jazz music was completed with a trumpet, clarinet, trombone and section of drums. The music was created with passion inspired by people’s lives. Ragtime was a musical style emerged from St. Louis in the late 1890s. The swing was the new style for Jazz. Benny Goodman was the “king of swing.” and he was the first white bandleader to feature black and white musicians playing together in public. There were other different styles…

    • 223 Words
    • 1 Page
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Musical Genre: Jazz

    • 192 Words
    • 1 Page

    Jazz is one of the musical genres that represent America. It had a combination of influences from Africa and Europe. When Africans were brought to the United States as slaves, they brought their music and culture with them. Samuel A. Floyd Jr. stated “…particular musical tendencies were brought with Africans to the New World…and spread throughout African-derived populations in the United States, eventually becoming an integral part of the music we know as jazz.” African slaves used musical expression for social purpose in the 1800s; they sang songs when they are working or they played drums. The immigration of Europeans started in the seventeenth century. They brought the instrumentations, the tonality, the chords, and the form into the United…

    • 192 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Ethnomusicology 50b

    • 1434 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Although bop and cool jazz popularized in a similar time frame, their individual demographics and cultural associations differed drastically. Jazz music began its rise to popularity in the 1940s through a style known as bebop, or bop, following the wildly popular dance genre known as swing (Meadows 244). Within this postwar period we saw a high concentration of immigrants, primarily African Americans, seeking opportunity and discovering their individual identities (Meadows 243). This shift in culture brought to life a transition from popular swing music, opting instead for increasingly complex and rich forms of music with unprecedented layering of melodies and harmonies, creating sounds unheard of from any of its predecessors (Deveaux & Giddins 12). Music became more daring and musically adventurous, straying away from conventional norms with bands consisting primarily of black musicians located in New York (Deveaux & Giddins 11). Bop compositions…

    • 1434 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Ethno 50B Essay #1

    • 1336 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Small Changes Make Big Differences A living jazz legend once exclaimed “jazz has borrowed from other genres of music and also has lent itself to other genres of music.” Herbie Hancock makes it clear that jazz has been an evolving form of art. And just as simple as the notion that music can change the world, music changes in itself. Jazz once evolved into something we call swing. Back in the roaring twenties people got up and danced to this kind of music. However, these simple and playful melodies that everyone were accustomed to transformed into intricate music with a different basis. When jazz was over everyone’s head and people stopped dancing, we call this period bop. Inevitably, new ideas emerged and jazz musicians decided to take a step back, leading into the cool period. Although it is hard to find the exact beginnings and ends to these distinct eras, I will show how musicians utilized different styles to express themselves.…

    • 1336 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Racism African American jazz musicians had almost always been treat less fairly then whites, especially near the end of the Swing Era. African Americans were tired of getting paid less then whites big swing bands. African Americans created Bebop as an outgrowth against all the racial prejudice and segregation they face. They also wanted to create a music for listening to, not dancing. They wanted their music to be more of an art form like it started out originally back in New Orleans…

    • 479 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Bebop Revolution

    • 2025 Words
    • 9 Pages

    In the 1940s, the younger generation of jazz musicians created a new style that came out of the 1930s' swing music. They partially strived to counter the popularization of swing with non-danceable music that demanded listening.[6] Mavericks like Dizzy Gillespie, Charlie Parker, Bud Powell, and Thelonious Monk were influenced by the preceding generation's adventurous soloists, such as pianists Art Tatum and Earl Hines; tenor saxophonists Coleman Hawkins and Lester Young; and trumpeter Roy Eldridge. Gillespie and Parker, both out of the Earl Hines Band in Chicago had traveled with some of the pre-bop masters, including Jack Teagarden, Earl Hines, and Jay McShann. While Gillespie was with Cab Calloway, he practiced with bassist Milt Hinton and developed some of the key harmonic and chordal innovations that would be the cornerstones of the new music; Charlie Parker did the same with bassist Gene Ramey while with McShann's group. These forerunners of the new music (which would later be termed bebop or bop—although Parker himself never used the term, feeling…

    • 2025 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Powerful Essays

Related Topics