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How Are Chemical Pesticides Used By Rachel Carson: The Use Of Chemicals?

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How Are Chemical Pesticides Used By Rachel Carson: The Use Of Chemicals?
The environment impacts everyone who lives in it. Whether it’s the birds, marine life or humans; who all leave some sort of evidence behind their existence. Many countries in the world where the governments do not regulate or research the effects of chemicals on living organisms can cause many health risks to their citizens and the environment. One such instance in history is in the United States of America after World War II, where synthetic chemical pesticides used by the government and farmers grow crops. Rachel Carson researched on why these pesticides were unsafe for humans, animals and especially nature. Rachel Carson fought to bring global attention to the use of chemicals. As well as launching the awareness and protection of human …show more content…
To illustrate, according to Hart’s article “Rachel Carson”, “[Nature] has importance, Maria [Rachel’s mother] was an expert on nature study insects, flowers, and such. Rachel spent a lot of time outside in the woods hiking, building campfires, watching and listening to the birds, and absorbing all her surroundings. (Hart)” Rachel’s passion of nature fueled her love and understanding for the environment. Rather, Carson’s childhood love of nature sprouted into researching for mankind.
Carson worked on bridging her before acquiring knowledge about nature into the scientific world benefitting researching, learning and the health of others. For example, according to the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service “Rachel Carson A Conservation Legacy”, “Carson attended Pennsylvania College for Women (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)”now called Chatham University as an English major, but switched her major to biology halfway through the course of her studies. Carson before pursued writing as she loved reading and writing as well as seeing it as one of her strengths in the academic field. Many scientists often struggle with bridging the gap between researching and communicating their
…show more content…
For instance, “Carson had become interested in the danger of pesticides while still associated with the Fish and Wildlife Service. [Carson’s] concern was accelerated with the introduction of DDT in 1945. Although [Carson] had left the Service to work on Silent Spring, [Carson’s] marine studies while [at the Fish and Wildlife Service] had provided [Carson] with early documentation on the effects of DDT on marine life. Since abnormalities always show up first in fish and wildlife, biologists were the first to see the effects of impending danger to the environment. (U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service)” DDT is otherwise known as Dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane, a synthetic organic compound which is used as a substance for killing insects. According to “ Rachel Carson, The Life And Legacy”, “In Silent Spring, Carson asked the hard questions about whether and why humans had the right to control nature; to decide who lives or dies, to poison or to destroy non-human life. (Lear)” Carson realized that pesticides were not only harmful to humans but especially birds. As according to U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service,“Fact Sheet: Natural History, Ecology, and History of Recovery,” “Bald eagles, in turn, were poisoned with DDT when they ate the contaminated fish. The chemical interfered with the ability of the birds to produce strong egg shells. As a result, their eggs had shells so thin that

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