Hospitality In Homer's The Odyssey

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Hospitality is one of the most important themes in Homer’s The Odyssey, and the Phaeacians seem to be among the more hospitable people that Odysseus meets. Among the other people that Odysseus encounters are Aeolus, Polyphemus, Eumaeus, and the suitors. Most of the people he meets are generally pretty hospitable, due to the fear of Zeus punishing them.
“Jove [Zeus] takes all respectable travelers under his protection”-Eumaeus
This rule is called xenia, meaning the mutual “friendship” between the host and the guest. However, not all beings find it necessary to abide by this rule, and the following paragraphs will demonstrate who, and what.

The Phaeacians were incredibly hospitable. They allowed Odysseus to sleep with the princess, and even
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Even though to Eumaeus Odysseus was only a beggar, he still treated him the best he could. Even after Odysseus tested his hospitality, he continued to host him. When Odysseus told Eumaeus that he was going to go to the palace, Eumaeus warned him about the suitors, and tried to protect him. Even though Eumaeus couldn't give him riches and gold like the Phaeacians, he genuinely cared about Odysseus.
“Bring in your fattest hog! I’ll slaughter it for our guest from far abroad. We’ll savor it ourselves. All too long we’ve sweated over these white-tusked boars-- our wretched labor-- while others wolf our work down free of charge!”-Eumaeus Guest who take advantage of or don’t follow xenia are punished. The suitors who resided at Odysseus’ palace were killed, because they harassed Telemachus and his mother, and nearly ate all of their food. When Odysseus stabbed Polyphemus in the eye, he was punished by Poseidon.
Quote from website.
Hospitality is a critical theme in The Odyssey. The Odyssey is based on xenia. Talk about how hospitality is important to the Odyssey, how him being a bad guest, or his host being a bad host is how he lost all of his men, essentially. Evidence, examples, etc. Closing sentence.

Paragraph 7
In conclusion, the Phaeacians and Eumaeus are nice and everyone else is not nice and is

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