Homosexuality in the Roman Catholic Church

Powerful Essays
Equivalent Love, Acceptance and Justice
Today the topic of homosexuality is often a controversial one around the world, but one that arises frequently none the less. It is becoming more and more socially acceptable for people all over the world to be open about their sexual orientations towards people of the same sex. It is now very clear and apparent that homosexuals worldwide come from all walks of life and take on nearly every single occupation and career. Many homosexuals have even come to make life long commitments to a single partner and raise families. However, homosexuals are repeatedly refused equal rights as heterosexuals, and are often discriminated against because of their sexual preferences. As an America, same sex marriage is a topic I hear almost daily when I am home. People all over my country are refused legal marriage licenses despite the fact that they live very similar lives to heterosexual couples and often raise children. Furthermore, as a Catholic I often hear condemnation of homosexuality, and even hear many people from my religion urging the government to continue to ban same sex marriage. Having many gay friends and acquaintances, and a homosexual uncle, the actions and thoughts of people in my country often upset me, and my religions teachings towards homosexuality sometimes confuse me. Therefore, I have researched the position of the Roman Catholic Church regarding not only homosexuality, but also same sex marriages. Throughout this essay, I will give an unbiased explanation of the Churches teachings that date back to the time of the Old Testament. The Roman Catholic Church maintains that homosexual orientations are not necessarily sinful, but are “disordered” (Catechism). However, the church preserves that all homosexual activity is immoral and most often sinful (Catechism). The Vatican uses a very particular theological framework based in scripture to defend its strong stance against homosexuality. While traditionally the Church has



Cited: Catechism of the Catholic Church. Washington, D.C.: United States Catholic Conference, 1994: nos. 2357-2359. www.Fordham.edu/libraries Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith, Letter on the Pastoral Care of Homosexual Persons, 1986, no. 12 Pope John Paul II. Apostolic Exhortation on the Family (Familiaris Consortio). Washington, D.C.: United States Catholic Conference, 1981 Yip, Andrew K. "Dare to Differ: Gay and Lesbian Catholic 's Assessment of Official Catholic Position of Sexuality." Sociology of Religion 58 (1997): 165-80. JSTOR. Fordham University Walsh Library, New York. 14 Oct. 2008. Keyword: Roman Catholic Homosexuality.

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Best Essays

    On November 14th, 2009, Canada’s first openly gay Catholic priest, Father Karl Clemens, married his long time partner in Toronto, Ontario. Clemens, who is close to seventy, retired from the Kingston, Ontario diocese after 33 years of service and moved to Toronto to advocate for the city’s gay village. Clemens stated that he was as prepared to handle the inevitable backlash from the Church and some of its followers as he was when he declared his sexual orientation in 2005, and strongly believes that…

    • 3778 Words
    • 16 Pages
    Best Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Roman Catholic Church

    • 877 Words
    • 4 Pages

    Roman Catholic and Protestant tradition The traditions of the Roman Catholic Church have been around for an extremely long time. The Roman Catholic Church and Protestantism both agree on many important things of the historic Christian faith. However the rituals and practices are quite different. The rituals and practices of a Roman Catholic Church consist of Mass, Baptism, Confession, receiving Communion, praying the Rosary, Last Rites, and much more. Whereas Protestantism was formed in the 16th…

    • 877 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    The Roman Catholic Church

    • 371 Words
    • 2 Pages

    The Roman Catholic Church After the fall of Rome, the Christian Church split into eastern and western Churches. The western Church became the Roman Catholic Church. Religion was an important part of medieval life. Many question if the Catholic Church was positive or negative during the middle ages. This essay will explain why the Church was a negative aspect during the medieval times. According to A Document 2, the Church started a court system called the Inquisition. The Inquisition included…

    • 371 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Art and the Roman Catholic Church have ties that go back to the simple foundation of Christianity itself. Through the beginning of the 1st century through modern times, art has played a crucial role for the church and it’s 2.1 billion person following. Art has been used to portray events in the history of Catholicism as well as to convey the message of the Bible, the Christian religions most valued source of information. Artistic styles have varied throughout the years, taking on a gothic look after…

    • 880 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    in the Roman Catholic Church, and therefore should be changed. The act of Clerical Celibacy is not a church indoctrinated order, rather it is a discipline and therefore can and should be changed. The act of sexual abuse amongst priests has risen in recent decades and many believe this is due to celibacy in the Catholic Church. Celibacy is the act of abstaining from sexual intercourse, especially for reasons of religious vows.(“Celibacy” def. 1) The Catechism of the Catholic Church states:…

    • 1172 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    be the preservation of Greek and Roman cultures? ESSAY SUBMISSION Historians consider the greatest achievement of the Byzantine Empire to be the preservation of Greek and Roman cultures because after the fall of the roman empire and the small Greek states the byzantine empire still kept their cultures making it one. The Byzantine ended up being the survivors after the collapse of the Roman Empire in the west. However if it was not because of the byzantine roman and ancient Greek cultures would…

    • 302 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    Mysticism as a religious practice was a mystery to me. Actually, I have never heard of this topic. Growing up Protestent, we are not affiliated with the Roman Catholic order or any of the Saints in the Catholic Church. Therefore, through this course I grew to understand and learn about the idea of mysticism and its importance in the Roman Catholic Church. Dating back hundred of years, mysticism is the idea of having a direct experience of ultimate reality, which in the end is God. Through mysticism, one…

    • 633 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The Catholic Church is a religion from Christianity, started in Rome, thus this religion is called Roman Catholic Church. The religion then grew into other empires and times like Medieval Europe. The Roman Catholic Church was a powerful institution during medieval times due to the strength of the Catholic Church after the fall of Rome, the education it brought and the power the Pope held. First of all, the Catholic Church was still very strong after the collapse of Rome. The Western part of the…

    • 391 Words
    • 2 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    the earth is Roman Catholic. “Roman Catholics in the world (nearly 1.1 billion) is greater than that of nearly all other religious traditions” (Roman Catholicism). The Roman Catholic Church is the largest religious tradition ever created. It was the first Christian church and its beginning can be traced back to Jesus’ twelve disciples. The Catholic Church is larger than all other christian churches combined. It is even larger than individual Isam religions Sunni and Shia. The church has made itself…

    • 1094 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Good Essays

    Before the reformation, the only church that existed in England was that of Roman Catholic Church. and it was seen to be tyrannical, stifling with numerous harsh church rulings enormous influence on how people thought and how subsequently they lived their lives. The Roman catholic church had at the time many supporters and covered a large proportion of the world which was called Christendom. Before the reformation, the Church had been one of the principal employers, with large numbers of farm workers…

    • 937 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays