Holodomor Genocide Essay

Better Essays
Holodomor Genocide Essay The famine that occurred in Ukraine in 1932 and 1933, also known as the Holodomor, wiped out millions of Ukrainians. The Soviet Union denied that this tragic event was genocide but some facts say different. Joseph Stalin, who was the leader of the Soviet Union during the famine, did not want Ukrainians to be independent from the Soviet Union, therefore he created the famine to target Ukrainians. Stalin did not only see Ukraine's independence as a threat, he also saw their resistance to collectivization as a threat to industrializing Russia, therefore he used industrialization as a way to eliminate the Ukrainians and he was especially harsh on people who resisted collectivization. However, that does not mean only the rebellions suffered. Every Ukrainian suffered as well. Stalin created many new laws that stood between Ukrainians and survival. With all the detailed planning that Stalin had done in order to prevent the Ukrainians from seeking independence, rebelling, and surviving, it is difficult to deny that the Holodmor was genocide. Ukraine’s independence all started when it was freed from the Czar’s control in 1917. However, Lenin took over the Soviet Union the same year and wanted to take back all the land the belonged to the Czar’s. Lenin demanded large amounts of grain from Ukraine but soon stopped and even gave them more freedom so that the Ukrainians would dislike him less. This made the Ukrainians believe in national pride again. They were proud of their language, art, customs, and religion. However, When Lenin died, Stalin took over. Stalin saw Ukraine’s independence from the Soviet Union as a threat because they were ethnically, culturally, and religiously different from Russia. Stalin wanted Ukraine to be under his control. Therefore he eliminated activities of the Ukrainian church. (Kuropas 2009) Priests and other people of the church were also sent away. Later on, he also got rid of the intelligentsia that

You May Also Find These Documents Helpful

  • Good Essays

    Holodomor is a man - made famine that took place between 1932 and 1933. The famine occurred in the Ukraine after the original leader Vladimir Lenin died and Joseph Stalin took control. When Stalin took control, he started new farming policies in which private farmland was ordered to give a large portion of their crops to the government. This made private farmers angry which started a revolt. In response to these revolts, Stalin ordered all farmland and livestock to be seized and no profit given to the farmers who owned the land. This was the start of the year long famine. Even though the famine is registered as a genocide and the events killed more people than Jewish people killed during the Holocaust, it was a barely noticed tragedy.…

    • 841 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Ultranationalism

    • 1469 Words
    • 6 Pages

    In critical times of great change or unrest within a nation, uncertainty and fear tends to spread among its citizens. This type of atmosphere is the perfect breeding ground for radical ultranationalist regimes to take hold. Ultranationalist regimes view situations such as these as opportunities to rebuild their nation from the ground and shape it to match their own vision. More often than not, they are willing to do whatever it takes to achieve their goals. An example of this is the Ukrainian Famine. It was a horrible crime against humanity as a direct result of Josef Stalin’s ultranationalist regime. The Soviet Union was formed in 1922 in the wake of Russian Revolution of 1917. This new radical government introduced communism to the people of Russia, believing that it would help rebuild and strengthen their nation. When Stalin took leadership in 1924, he veered away from Lenin’s original philosophies and national interests. Stalin eliminated collective leadership, giving himself all of the power. He also prioritized spreading communism throughout Russia…

    • 1469 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Good Essays

    Holocaust Essay

    • 722 Words
    • 3 Pages

    Propaganda, the relocation of people to the Ghettos, the creation of laws to strip people of their rights, and the use of technology to increase the efficiency of the machinery of genocide. Genocide is a term created after World War II to describe the systematic murder of an entire, political, cultural, or religious group. These are just some of the numerous systems that Adolf Hitler used to implement the Holocaust. Because of Hitler, nearly six million Jews were exterminated. Hitler's idea of a "perfect world" was a world full of people, but only people with blonde hair and blue eyes, although he himself had dark hair and brown eyes. So basically, he is a hypocrite in my opinion.…

    • 722 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    Cited: .A Long Way Gone.Beah, Ishmael. A Long Way Gone Memoirs of a boy soldier. New York: Sarah Crichton Books, 2007.…

    • 787 Words
    • 4 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    In 1994, 800,000 Rwandan people were killed in just 100 days. This makes the Rwandan genocide one of the worst genocides in history. The Rwandan people, which consist of the Twa, the Tutsi and the Hutu, all speak the same language and had been living together with only minor conflict between the groups until 1959 (“Rwanda genocide of 1994”). In 1959, tensions flared when the Hutu people attacked the Tutsi in retaliation for the Tutsi supposedly killing a Hutu leader (“Rwanda genocide of 1994”). Over the next thirty-five years, the Hutu abolished the Tutsi monarchy and rose to power (“Rwanda genocide of 1994”).…

    • 587 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Better Essays

    The main motive of this photograph is essentially a global history of the Jewish people. It is very specific, sad and instructive. In order to properly clarify this picture, we have to start from the beginning, shed light on the history of the Jewish people, and pay particular attention to the dark times during the Holocaust, and particularly refer to the Jewish understanding of the holiday.…

    • 2104 Words
    • 9 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Better Essays

    Holocaust Essay

    • 1218 Words
    • 5 Pages

    “Hate and intolerance are the catalysts for the destruction of a family, of a culture, and a nation”, by Werner Gellert, chair of The New Mexico Holocaust and Intolerance Museum and Study Center. (history:www.nmholocaustmuseum.com) It is vital to remember and pass to a new generation the history and lessons of the Holocaust since over 5.7 million Jewish people had their lives taken away by a man who was intolerant of their religion. The largest numbers of victims of the Holocaust were Polish citizens. Adolf Hitler tried to destroy a nation by destroying families who were targeted because of their religion and culture.…

    • 1218 Words
    • 5 Pages
    Better Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    To a large extent, the extermination of the Jewish race was not the singular goal of the Holocaust. The reason this is true is because Adolf Hitler had many goals as well as eliminating the Jewish Race within the holocaust, therefore it was not the singular goal. Hitler’s goals were to create a pure Aryan Race, to eliminate other races and other groups, make Germans the master race so they could dominate the world, and to prove to everyone that the races other than Germans and Aryans were racially inferior. There are some reasons that it might be considered that it was the singular goal to exterminate the Jewish race such as the scale and proportion of the…

    • 1383 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Cambodia Genocide Essay

    • 676 Words
    • 3 Pages

    The Cambodian Genocide happened in 1975 when the Cambodian government was taken over by the Khmer Rouge. Millions of people were killed and evacuated to labor camps where they were abused and starved to death. Even though all of this was happening in Cambodia, no other countries came to help take back the government. Why would other countries step aside when a country is in desperate need?…

    • 676 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Genocide In Bosnia Essay

    • 1418 Words
    • 6 Pages

    By the End of the Cold war the world had already seen the end of hundreds of wars and countless violations of human rights. With witnessing, these events substantial progress had been made to defining what human rights are and what constitutes a violation to human rights. The first of theses inalienable human rights being the biblical right to life. Several Non- governmental organizations dedicate their time and energy to maintaining a close watch over the world to report on any and all violations of human rights. An example of an area where non -governmental organizations have been relentless in their efforts to end human rights violation was in Bosnia in the early 1990’s.…

    • 1418 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Stalin also brought his ideas of government to the Ukraine. Russia had gained control before Stalin’s leadership but the harsh ruling didn’t start till he was in power. Stalin believed that the Soviet influence needed to be strong in Ukraine so…

    • 194 Words
    • 1 Page
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Satisfactory Essays

    Holocaust essay

    • 509 Words
    • 3 Pages

    As tragic as it may be, Innocence was lost throughout the Holocaust. The Holocaust was Adolf Hitler’s, the Nazi party’s leader, idea for creating his idea of a perfect race. Lasting around six and a half years, anybody that did not belong in his German community or race was murdered or put to work in concentration camps. Millions of people from different races were killed throughout the Holocaust. Throughout the massacre, not only were lives lost, but innocence as well Swing kids, a movie directed by Tomas Carter, is based upon a group of teenage bous, trying to find who they are under the Nazi influences. Night, a book written by Eli Weisel, focused on a Jewish boy named Eliezer and his journey throughout the Holocaust. Schindler’s List, a Steven Spielberg movie, concerns a man named Oskar Schindler, a Nazi follower, and the struggles he faces with the decisions he makes towards his Jewish workers.…

    • 509 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Satisfactory Essays
  • Good Essays

    After 250 years of living under Russian Tsarist rule, the Ukrainians became part of the Soviet Union in 1922. Farmers thrived, economic freedom was permitted, and private enterprise was allowed. Among these, writers, artists, and scholars grew. Stalin, in 1924, took over Russia after the previous leader, Vladimir Lenin, died. Later, in 1928, Stalin launched a plan to force farmers into giving up their private land, livestock, and farms. Joseph Stalin felt he could not trust the Ukraine peasantry; he believed that the upper class farmers, or kulaks, were holding crops. Stalin took all the grain from the peasants. He had his men search for any hidden grain and Stalin analyzed fecal matter to see if the Ukrainians had stolen ‘government property’ and eaten the grain themselves. It was because of Stalin that many starved and resorted to eating anything. They drank water to fill their empty bellies. Small children perished first, then the elderly, followed by the men, and soon after, the women. Up to twenty-five percent of the population died because Stalin took all of the food.…

    • 742 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Good Essays

    The USSR (The Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) was found in 1922 by Vladimir Lenin. The USSR was shortly taken over by Joseph Stalin, which lasted from the 1920’s to the 1953.(DeSomma, 12) During the time of Stalin’s ruling the NKVD (People's Commissariat for Internal Affairs), a secret police force, murdered many soviet citizens and jailed many others to Gulags. Gulags were forced labor camps that people were sent to if they were seen dangerous to the union. The Soviet then destroyed all owned farms to be replaced by state owned farms, this caused the Holomodor (1932- 1933). The Holomodor was a man made famine that killed 5 to 7 million peasants. The Great Purges (1937- 1938) were Stalin's attempt to remove any threats to the communist party continuance. Many people were killed or imprisoned each year. Numerous massacres occurred like the Vinnytsia Massacres, the Katyn Forest Massacre, and The Medvedev Forest Massacre. (Pierpaoli,1)…

    • 549 Words
    • 3 Pages
    Good Essays
  • Powerful Essays

    Holocaust Pov Essay

    • 1265 Words
    • 6 Pages

    Life under the constant, careful watch of Hitler and his minions has not been easy for my family and I. Traveling from place to place and never knowing what to expect next. We’ve been one of the few fortunate ones, being able to stick together throughout these troubled times, despite several life or death moments; somehow my faith in G-d has remained intact. It’s a shame all of these acts of hatred could be inflected on a group of people solely because they believed differently. Before the war, no one gave it a second thought to my being Jewish. I was just Sarah, a sister, a daughter, a friend… but things started changing quickly in Germany, so quickly it’s all just a blur in my memory now.…

    • 1265 Words
    • 6 Pages
    Powerful Essays