Holly Golightly as an existential protagonist

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Who is Holly Golightly? Socialite? Opportunist? A Lost Soul?-a "free bird" not to be caged?....no, she is an existential rogue. Truman Capote carefully handled the creation of this character and through her was able to elaborate on major existential themes. She is clearly one of Capote's most intricate characters and possibly, the greatest existential icon in both American literature and classical, American cinema . With this analysis, Holly Golightly must be broken down to obtain a further glance into the numerous existential elements she inhibits.

"It may be normal darling: but I'd rather be natural"-Golightly. From the get go, Golightly expresses herself to the narrator like an open book. Her fears, insecurities, and wants are the basis of most conversations both these characters share. You know the days when you get the mean reds? The mean reds. You mean the blues? No, the blues are because you're getting fat, and maybe it's been raining too long, that's all. The mean reds are horrible. Suddenly you're afraid. And you don't know what you're afraid that. Don't you ever have that feeling"-Holly Golightly. The mean reds, as described by Golightly, is a notion closely knit to the theistic existentialist. Angst, fear, worry, these feelings come across Golightly and are only relieved when she frequents Tiffany's. "It calms me down right away, the quietness and proud look of it; nothing very bad could happen to you there, not with those kind men with their nice suits, and the lovely smell of silver and alligator wallets. If I could find a real life place like Tiffany's then I'd buy some furniture and give the cat a name"-Golightly. The comfort Golightly feels isn't so much a connection between her materialistic wants and the store itself, but more so because this location offers comfort, the type of comfort the theistic existentialist so direly seeks. Tiffany's is in itself the closest representation of stability that Holly comes across throughout both the

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