"History vs Hollywood: The Truth Behind Braveheart"

Topics: William Wallace, Edward I of England, Braveheart Pages: 4 (1251 words) Published: March 21, 2004
For the most part the History surrounding "Braveheart" is accurate, but there are several significant people and events which simply do not match up historically. After watching the movie and reviewing the history behind it, it becomes clear that Hollywood felt they needed to alter several things in order to make the film more entertaining to their viewers. It is interesting to compare the depiction of the characters and events portrayed in the movie to the actual history that surrounds them.

The story behind the movie "Braveheart" focuses on the historic tale of Sir William Wallace of Elerslie, One of Scotland's greatest heroes. During the 12th century King Edward I of England, also known as Longshanks, ruled Scotland. After returning to his childhood home, William Wallace planned on becoming a farmer and raising a family. After English soldiers had murdered his wife however, his attention became focused on the English occupation of Scotland. United together with other Scottish warriors, Wallace decides to bypass negotiations and fight the English on his own terms (Clater-Roszak 12).

William Wallace did indeed lead a rebellion against English occupation in 1296, and was victorious at the battle of Stirling Bridge and lost at Falkirk. After he was captured, he was tried and executed as shown in the film. Several other aspects of his life were not accurately depicted however. Wallace was portrayed as a poor man who was secretly married right before he got in trouble with the English. Actually, he was a commoner who was well educated, and if he wasn't involved with the war he may have been a scholar. All landed men were required to sign the Ragman Roll, which bound everyone who signed it in loyalty to England's King Edward I. Those who refused, like Wallace, were outlawed (William Wallace's...42). In response, Wallace and Andrew Moray organized other outlawed men into an army. Moray was killed at Stirling Bridge and was pretty much forgotten, he was not even...
Continue Reading

Please join StudyMode to read the full document

Become a StudyMode Member

Sign Up - It's Free