History of Volleyball

Topics: Volleyball, YMCA, Holyoke, Massachusetts Pages: 22 (8382 words) Published: October 23, 2014
History of Volleyball
Today the sport of Volleyball is 119 years old; there are more than 46 million people in North America who play volleyball. There are 800 million players worldwide who play volleyball at least once a week. Volleyball was created in 1895 by William G. Morgan an instructor at the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) in Holyoke, Mass. William Morgan wanted to create a game which would have less physical contact then basketball for his class of businessmen at the time. William G. Morgan He then decided to use a combination of elements from popular existing sports and created a game that he called Mintonette. William G. Morgan borrowed some of Mintonette’s characteristics from tennis and handball. Another sport it gained some of its characteristics from is basketball, which was created just 16 kilometers away in the city of Springfield, Massachusetts, just four years prior. On July 7, 1900 during a demonstration of the game, someone remarked to Morgan that the players seemed to be volleying the ball back and forth over the net, and perhaps "volleyball" would be a more vivid name for the sport. The first game of “volleyball” was played at the Springfield College. In 1900, a special ball was also designed for the sport. The volleyball net was borrowed from the sport tennis, and Morgan wanted to raise it just over the average man’s head, and raised it 6 feet 6 inches above the floor. It had a court of 25 ft x 50 ft (7.6 m x 15.2 m ), and any number of players. A typical match had nine innings with three serves for each team in each inning. Volleyball at the time had no limit to the number of ball contacts for each team before volleying the ball over to the opponents’ side of the court. If you failed on serving the ball over the net a second try was granted. Hitting the ball into the net was considered a foul which consisted of a point loss or side out, except in the case of the first attempt of a serve. After a decade of volleyball gaining popularity amongst the world, an offensive style of passing the ball was created in 1916, in the Philippines. This consisted in a high volley of the ball then it was to be struck by another player (the set and spike). A Year later in 1917 the game was changed from a 21 point game to a 15 point game. Three hits per side and the back row attack rules were created in 1920. Ten years later in 1930, the first two man beach game was played. This was a typical volleyball game that was played on a beach in sand with only two people. In 1934, the approval and recognition of national volleyball referees were introduced into the game. In 1948, the first two-man beach tournament was held, and in 1949, the initial World Championships were held in Prague, Czechoslovakia. With the popularity growing fast with the sport of volleyball it was introduced to the Olympic Games in Tokyo, in 1964. In 1995, the sport of Volleyball was 100 years old. Additional rule changes were introduced in 2000. These changes include allowing the ball on a serve to touch the net as long as it makes it over the net and on to the opponents’ side of the court. The service area was also expanded to allow the players to serve from anywhere behind the end line but still within the width of the sidelines. Another change that was made was to lighten up the calls on faults for carries and double hits, which is allowing multiple contacts to the ball by a single person on a team’s first contact. Today, a volleyball match is won by the team that wins 2 of 3 sets or 3 of 5 sets. In the case of a 2-2 tie, the deciding set (the 5th) is played to 15 points with a minimum lead of 2 points. There is no point limit. In a best of 3 match, the deciding set (the 3rd) is played to 15 points with a minimum lead of 2 points. There is no point limit. The history of volleyball has been played both indoors and outdoors, recreationally and competitively. Volleyball today is played from the home town school gym to the massive...
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