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History 106

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History 106
Peace keeping Tasks
Patrolling
Unarmed monitoring
Maintain a physical presence
“Dextraze in the Congo”
How peace keeping is kept in 1950’s
Consent
Impartiality
Non-threating behaviour

UNEF in Egypt
The 1960’s
The rise and decline of peacekeeping
A government priority as it falters in practice
1962 Cuban Missile Crisis
Kennedy – create a quarantine
Behind the scenes
October
First time military resources were used despite the prime minister
Fight over how to use missiles
Lester B. Pearson is elected and is a peace-maker, then he decides that nuclear weapons should still be allowed
Pearson’s troops is kicked out of Egypt
Pierre Elliot Trudeau succeeds Pearson WHEN?
Local Protesting and sides an abetting war
Assassinations in 1968
1970s
A New defense policy
New operations under trudeau
ISCS (S. Vietnam) 1973
UNEF II (Egypt)1974
UNDOF (Golan Heights) 1974
UnFil (S. Lebanon) 1978

Why take part
Our post war influence was over
Less agreement on our other roles
A return to the Golden Age
A non-military role for the military http://www.un.org/en/peacekeeping/operations/past.shtml something that US can’t do
The 1980s
UN peacekeepers win the Nobel Prize
UNIIMOG (Iran/Iraqu) 1988
Should we go into such a dangerous place without a public debate?
Did Peacekeeping die with the Cold War?
The revival of the UN
The decline of Militaries
New challenges
The Cold War Ends
A new peacekeeping era begins
Namibia (UNTAG) 1989
Civilial observers
RCMP officers
“guarantors of peace and democracy”
Military involvement lessens more civilian involvement
Agenda for Peace, 1992
UN Secretary-General Bhoutros-Ghali
A web of activity including “peacemaking and collective enforcement”
Canada is lukewarm
A rapid reaction force?
A threat to Canadian sovereignty
1990 warrior society development of golf course oaka Quebec
Peacekeeping
Somalia: A Failed State
UNISOM 1
Canada initially chooses not to

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