Hippies Counterculture

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Imagine a world without hippies, or hippies at heart. What a dull world it would be. Hippies were the counterculture of our world. Many people tend to think that the term hippies and hipsters are the same thing. In reality, A hippie and a hipster are absolutely two different things. The term “hip” was made during the jazz age. Hipster is a subculture, while hippies are a counterculture. Hipsters started during the 1960’s, just as hippies did which is why there is so much confusion between the two terms. Hipsters did not gain popularity until the 1990s. “Hipsters are a group of people that value independent thinking, appreciate art and are middle-class. Hipsters are linked with having a unique fashion sense and often reject mainstream clothing …show more content…
Hipsters do just this. Hippies lived in a love people, care free world. They see the world as a place seeking help, and they did just this in any possible way while loving it all the same. Hipsters on the other hand view the world as a horrible place, and a dog eat dog world. They are attention seekers and do not show interest in the world besides a place to take a cool photo. Hippies stood for something. They stood up for what they believed in, and they fought for their rights. They were the starters of protesting which is so famous today. “Many people believe that hippies were against everything and did not really stand for anything. These people are the ones who confuse the difference in hippies and hipsters.” (Evich) Hippies believed in everything. They might not have agreed with everything, but they believed in absolutely everything. The things that they did not agree with were the things that they stood up and fought for until they won.
In conclusion, Hippies and hipsters are commonly confused because of their names. A hippie is not a hipster, and a hipster is not a hippie. One will find through research that hippies have a more positive image rather than a hipster. One should choose to have hippie-like characteristics rather than hipster-like characteristics, because they are earth friendly, they made their own clothes, and they believed in

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