High School Student

Topics: English language, Education, Bilingual education Pages: 70 (20270 words) Published: September 16, 2013
Students
Chapter 3 Learner Diversity: Differences in Today’s Students Chapter 4 Changes in American Society: Their Influences on Today’s Schools

ISBN: 0-536-29980-3

Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, Second Edition, by Donald Kauchak and Paul Eggen Published by Prentice-Hall/Merrill. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

ISBN: 0-536-29980-3

Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, Second Edition, by Donald Kauchak and Paul Eggen Published by Prentice-Hall/Merrill. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Learner Diversity
Differences in Today’s Students
T
eachers begin their careers expecting to find classrooms like the ones they experienced when they were students. In some ways classrooms are the same. Students go to school to learn, but they also want to have fun and be with their friends. They expect to work but often need encouragement from their teachers. They’re typical kids. Classrooms are changing, however; the population of our schools is becoming increasingly diverse. Students come from different cultures and speak many different languages at home; they possess a range of abilities and talents; and issues involving differences between boys and girls are receiving increased attention. In this chapter we examine this diversity as we try to answer the following questions: ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ What is cultural diversity, and how does it influence student learning? How are the educational experiences of boys and girls different? How do schools accommodate ability differences in learners? What are learning styles, and how should teachers respond to them? Who are learners with exceptionalities, and how can schools best meet their needs? Let’s see how learner diversity influences the lives of teachers. Shannon Wilson, a fifth-grade teacher in a large urban elementary school, walked around her classroom, helping student groups as they worked on their social studies projects.A number of hands were raised, and she felt relieved that she had Maria Arguelas, her special education resource teacher, to help her. Shannon had 27 students in her class, seven of whom did not speak English as their first language. Five of the seven were Hispanic, and fortunately Maria was able to assist them in their native language. Shannon often spent extra time with Kwan and Abdul, the other two non-English speakers. Maria also assisted Shannon by working with four of her students who had learning disabilities. Shannon’s class was preparing for Parents’ Day, an afternoon in which parents and other caregivers would join the class in celebrating the students’ ancestral countries. The students would present information about the countries’ history, geography, and cultures in their projects.The class had already prepared a large world map with pins marking the students’ countries of origin.While several of the pins were clustered in Mexico and Central and South America, the map showed that students also came from many other parts of the world. Each student was encouraged to invite a family member to come and share a part of the family’s native culture. The parents could bring food, music, and native dress from their different homelands.

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ISBN: 0-536-29980-3

• ● •

Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, Second Edition, by Donald Kauchak and Paul Eggen Published by Prentice-Hall/Merrill. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.

Figure 3.1

Dimensions of Diversity

Your first classroom is likely to be comprised of students from a variety of backgrounds, primarily because student diversity in today’s schools is rapidly increasing (Hodgkinson, 2001) but also because new teachers are more likely to find jobs in schools that serve diverse populations (Olson, 2003a). This diversity has several sources (Figure 3.1), and it presents both challenges and...


Links: module on the Companion Website at www.prenhall.com/kauchak). Click on “Student CEC” for information on Tools You Need, Career Info, Goals, Chapter Directory, and Regional Contacts. The Career Info module contains additional information on résumé writing, interviewing, and building a professional portfolio. Write a brief description of career opportunities in special education and how your talents and personality might match these.
ISBN: 0-536-29980-3
Chapter 3 Learner Diversity
125
Introduction to Teaching: Becoming a Professional, Second Edition, by Donald Kauchak and Paul Eggen Published by Prentice-Hall/Merrill. Copyright © 2005 by Pearson Education, Inc.
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