Health and Medicine of the Middle Ages

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Health and Medicine of the middle Ages During the Middle Ages people lived very different lives compared to what we live today. They were very unsanitary and apt to catching illnesses. There were many different types of diseases and epidemics during the middle ages and very little was done to prevent them with the lack of knowledge the people had about each illness. There were many different types of illnesses and epidemics occurring in Europe during the middle ages. Some of these illnesses resulted in death and some did not. The less serious illnesses were known as cholera which is infectious and attacks the intestines. Dysentery is another, which is a case of bloody diarrhea and is potentially deadly. Influenza which is a respiratory illness and is more sever than a cold. The measles which causes a skin rash and can be spread through body fluids, and the mumps, they cause painful swelling and has symptoms of the flu (Consumer). The more fatal illnesses were known as Leprosy, which was widely spread throughout Europe and many were punished and forgotten for spreading this illness. Another is the Bubonic Plague also known as the Black Death. It was the most famous epidemic and had killed over 25 million people in one year 's time (Health). Letellier 2

The Black Death occurred in late 1347 through early 1351 which had stripped the country of about one fourth of the population (Diseases). This epidemic had originated from Asia and could be spread through fleas and rats. This disease attacked the lymph nodes and the respiratory system and was very fatal once infected. To prevent from getting this illness many believed that eating healthy and drinking wine and even trying doctor 's remedies would prevent from getting ill (Diseases). This disease had left towns and homes abandoned, making living almost impossible. This epidemic was very serious. Medical treatments during the middle Ages were different from what we have today. They were just beginning to



Cited: Page (www.mnsu.edu/emuseum/history/middleages/health.html.) Health and Medicine. 18 Oct. 2005 (www.medieval-life.net/diseases.html.) Diseases during the middle Ages. 2000. 18 Oct. 2005 Family Medical and Prescription Drug Guise. New ed. Lincolnwood: Consumer Guide, 1993. (63, 64, 67)

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