Harlem Renaissance Dbq Essay

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The Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance exploded in a New York community during 1918 and 1937; some refer to as The New Negro Movement. It was the time when Black Americans were passionate about shedding their Jim Crowe past. Black Americans wanted a new society for themselves that were viewed as talented and intelligent. The Harlem Renaissance enhanced the appreciation of Negro society showing that the black man was more than just an asset to be claimed, rather a talent to be admired. The Harlem Renaissance was triggered by The Great Migration. The South had become unbearable for the Black American, racism was on the rise and so was lynching. Black Americans no longer felt they could survive in the South under these conditions. The
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Body Paragraph:
• The Harlem Renaissance created a new outlook on life for Black American society.
• The movement encouraged them to express themselves through written forms, politics, intellectually and artistically.
• Black Americans were no longer seen with child-like existence, but as actual assets to society as equals.
VII. Body Paragraph:
• A great leader in the advancement of the Black American Society was W.E.B DuBois.
• Double-consciousness
• Art galleries believed that Black artist should be identified with African culture.
VIII. Body Paragraph:
• George Schuyler’s book, “Black No More’’
• Black No More is a company in Harlem, New York that can turn black people permanently white.
• Black No More turned black men and women white but unfortunately had no effect on changing their genes to white as well.
IX. Body Paragraph:
• Nella Larsen’s book, “Passing”
• Black people passing as white people.
• The book lies out the feel of the Harlem Renaissance.

X. Conclusion:
• The Harlem Renaissance was a very influential time in U.S American history
• Identifies Black people as being whole and complex people or human beings.
• . It was a time for lack people to shed the Jim Crowe image and move on as

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