Harlem Renaissance

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The Harlem Renaissance

The Harlem Renaissance was a time when African-American artistic creativity started to flower in the 1920's, centered in the Harlem community of New York City. It was a literary and artistic movement celebrating African-American culture. This movement was led by well-educated, middle-class African Americans who expressed pride in the African-American experience. They would celebrate their heritage and wrote with defiance and poignancy about the trails of being black in a white world.

New York's Harlem in the early 1900's was an overbuilt neighborhood with new apartment houses. Enterprising African-American realtors began to buy and lease this property to other African Americans who were eager to move into the prospering neighborhood. As the number of blacks went up the number of whites went down. Blacks were moving in the city of Harlem which made the whites leave the city of Harlem. Harlem grew to be the center of black America and the birthplace of the political, social, and cultural movement the Harlem Renaissance.

The Harlem Renaissance was a time when black poets arrived and African-American performances started, and of course jazz. Because of the Harlem Renaissance all of these things became popular and were accepted by many whites like the shuffle along. I believe this was the cause of many changes in American history were not only did whites see them selves as better but blacks saw the as lesser then that of whites. But because the Harlem Renaissance blacks see them selves as equals as whites and whites start to accept the blacks more then they did before the Harlem Renaissance. This is the start of good things to happen to the African-American people of the 19th century.

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